Rebuilding Together Nashville
6101 Centennial Blvd.
Nashville TN 37209
Mission Statement
Rebuilding Together Nashville’s Mission Statement

Repairing homes, revitalizing communities, rebuilding lives. 

Rebuilding Together Nashville’s Vision Statement
 
Safe homes and communities for everyone.  

Rebuilding Together Nashville’s Core Values
  • We are committed to helping low-income homeowners and communities and to respecting their integrity, strengths and assets. We strengthen lives, homes, and communities.

  • We work in partnership with communities, involving neighbors in all aspects of our work. We value collaboration with other groups who share similar goals.

  • We believe in high quality planning, delivery and evaluation of our services.

  • We believe in inclusiveness and seek to promote a diversity that is reflective of our communities.

  • Our core initiative and our common denominator is that of volunteers delivering free services to homeowners, along with the cost-effective leveraging of donated materials, supplies, and labor.

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Kaitlin Dastugue
Board Chair Mr. Edward Henley
Board Chair Company Affiliation Pillars Development
History & Background
Year of Incorporation 1995
Former Names
Christmas In April - Nashville
Organization's type of tax exempt status 501-C3
Financial Summary
Graph: Expense Breakdown Graph - All Years
 
 
Projected Expenses $683,578.00
Projected Annual Revenue 685000 (2019)
Statements
Mission
Rebuilding Together Nashville’s Mission Statement

Repairing homes, revitalizing communities, rebuilding lives. 

Rebuilding Together Nashville’s Vision Statement
 
Safe homes and communities for everyone.  

Rebuilding Together Nashville’s Core Values
  • We are committed to helping low-income homeowners and communities and to respecting their integrity, strengths and assets. We strengthen lives, homes, and communities.

  • We work in partnership with communities, involving neighbors in all aspects of our work. We value collaboration with other groups who share similar goals.

  • We believe in high quality planning, delivery and evaluation of our services.

  • We believe in inclusiveness and seek to promote a diversity that is reflective of our communities.

  • Our core initiative and our common denominator is that of volunteers delivering free services to homeowners, along with the cost-effective leveraging of donated materials, supplies, and labor.

Background

Rebuilding Together Nashville, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit, restores, rebuilds and provides critical repairs at homes of low-income residents. For over 20 years, Rebuilding Together Nashville has served the Nashville community by helping to preserve affordable homeownership and revitalize neighborhoods. The organization was founded as Christmas In April in 1995 and changed its name to Rebuilding Together Nashville in 2003. The organization remained completely volunteer run until the flood  of 2010 when the organization was called upon to build its capacity and respond to the post-flood rebuilding efforts.


Today, we work in neighborhoods across Nashville to provide year-round critical home repairs and lead community revitalization initiatives. Rebuilding Together’s Safe and Healthy Housing Improvement Program (SHHIP) is our agency’s core program aimed at addressing critical home repair needs for low-income homeowners in Nashville. Our purpose is to remove health and safety hazards in the homes of local low-income homeowners with a special focus on three populations: seniors, those with disabilities, and Veterans. We work to achieve our vision of safe homes and communities for everyone through direct home repairs and homeowner education.

Each home receives critical repairs according to each home’s uniquely tailored work scope aimed at ensuring the safety and health of the household. Rebuilding Together provides these repairs through utilizing both volunteers as well as contractors on repairs requiring technical expertise, such as mechanical, plumbing, electrical, and roofing work. All of the work is completed with a special focus on making homes more accessible for aging homeowners.

RTN is one of 130+ Rebuilding Together affiliates at work in towns and cities nationwide.

Impact

To date, Rebuilding Together Nashville has made meaningful improvements on more than 500 Nashville area homes. In the short-term, Rebuilding Together Nashville seeks to ensure that all immediate barriers to health and safety within the home are removed and health and safety hazards identified in the initial home inspection have been remediated though the course of our work. We track and measure this though using the Health and Safety Priorities as a post-work assessment.

In the medium term, we seek to educate and empower homeowners to maintain their homes to prevent critical issues from developing. Much of this education happens on site during projects (i.e. while cleaning out air filters, installing smoke detectors, etc.) and through 1-on-1 educational sessions. For example, we include seasonal home maintenance checklists as part of our project close out packets for every homeowner.

In the long-term, we seek to ensure that no homeowner feels pressured to sell their home or move to a long-term care facility pre-maturely due to unaddressed critical repairs or needed modifications within their current home. Every homeowner we work with will feel empowered to live with dignity in their current home and age in place.

RTN keeps records of every home repair project completed including all demographic and income data captured from the application. Annually, we measure the number of homes we impact and the number of individuals impacted by our work. We additionally track the number of volunteers engaged and total volunteer hours.

In FY 2017-2018, we completed 18 total home renovations though our SHHIP program, directly impacting a total of 26 household members. We engaged 152 volunteers who gave a total of 1,013 volunteer hours. Last year, through our two government funders, the City's Barnes Fund for Affordable Housing and MDHA, we have grown our program capacity to serve more homeowners with more significant home repair needs than our previous program years. 

This past year, we completed a place-based neighborhood strategy in partnership with the Metropolitan Development and Housing Agency (MDHA) in the North Nashville neighborhood near Buchanan Street. We successfully completed these 13 home renovations and in almost every instance, leveraged federal dollars from MDHA with corporate or in-kind support. 

Additionally,  RTN successfully begun implementing a 5-year, forgivable lien for the full cost of repairs for each homeowner served through our SHIPP program. This provides a level of security that our program will not be used to help flip homes in light of Nashville''s hot real estate market. If a homeowner chooses to sell their home within the five-year window, the funds are repaid back to RTN and invested in the home of another qualified homeowner. We met our goal of successfully integrating this process into our program.

We also achieved our final goal from last year of implementing our partnership with Hands On Nashville's Home Energy Savings (HES) program though our joint work funded by the Barnes Fund for Affordable Housing. In July of 2018, Hands On Nashville officially handed over the Home Energy Savings Program to RTN. 

 Goals for FY 2018-2019 include: (1) Successfully integrate and execute our new Home Energy Savings (HES) program and serve at a minimum 20 homeowners this year. (2) Develop and garner support for a Target Community Strategy to launch in summer of 2019 (3) Grow our Board membership through a thoughtful Board recruitment strategy and (4) grow our unrestricted revenues 
 
 
 
 egthen Board governance practices 
 
Needs

1) Unrestricted funding to account for inevitable contingencies that come with home rehabilitation projects and to cover the true administrative costs to deliver our high-quality home repair program.

2) Rebuilding Together Nashville relies on volunteers, particularly skilled volunteers with flexible schedules, to lead rebuild days and help with smaller, one-off home repair projects. We welcome all handy men and women to join our team of dedicated volunteers. Please email rtnashville@gmail.com if interested in learning more.

3.) We are additionally looking for full or part-time office volunteers to assist with our client intake process and other administrative duties. Please email rtnashville@gmail.com if interested.

4.) To accomplish all short and long term goals, Rebuilding Together Nashville needs to increase brand awareness. By improving our visibility, we hope to increase in homeowner applications, sponsor participation, and volunteer opportunities. We are currently seeking donated PR/Communications expertise and expanding membership on our PR/Fundraising committee. 

5.) Reduced/free office space. Alongside the homeowners that we serve, we are acutely aware of rising real estate costs in Nashville. We are seeking new office space to house our growing staff. We are currently seeking +/- 1,000 sqft of office/shared space with a secure storage area for our mobile tool trailers.

Other ways to donate, support, or volunteer
There are many ways to support our work as a volunteer, a general supporter, and as a donor.  We have opportunities for unskilled and skilled volunteers to give their time and talents on our rebuild projects throughout the year. Individual volunteers may sign up to our volunteer e-blast to get notified when these opportunities arise. Follow this link to sign up for our volunteer list: https://signup.e2ma.net/signup/1836234/1787558/. We also host sponsored corporate groups on rebuild projects throughout the year. Call our office to learn more about getting your corporate or civic group involved. We also work with contractors and count donated skilled labor and materials as an in-kind service donation.
 
We accept monetary donations online through our website or by mail by sending a check directly to our office. We also host fundraising events though out the year. Follow us on social media or sign up for our monthly e-newsletter (link on our website) to stay in the loop! 
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Housing, Shelter / Housing Rehabilitation
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Family Services
Tertiary Organization Category Housing, Shelter / Home Improvement/Repairs
Areas of Service
Areas Served
TN - Davidson
Currently, funding has been made available to assist low-income homeowners in Davidson County.  We will consider Veterans with housing needs in areas outside Nashville and match resources when available to provide services beyond the Nashville Metro area.  
Board Chair Statement

As a young child, I recall my family received food from a local non-profit when we were without. I remember the positive impact that a simple act of generosity made on our morale, and it is that feeling that now inspires me to be a part of organizations making a difference in the lives of struggling low-income families. Over the last 30 years, I have established a successful career in the building science industry, yet nothing brings me more professional joy than witnessing Rebuilding Together utilize construction knowledge and resources to directly improve the health, safety, and energy efficiency of those who are most in need. We are conquering the challenge of affordable housing… daily.


Rebuilding Together Nashville’s greatest challenge for FY17 will be to find a continuing source of revenue to support our low-income homeowners… while still continuing to meet the needs of clients with general repairs and rebuilds.

CEO Statement
Coming to Rebuilding Together Nashville from working in housing policy and city planning, I was no stranger to the growing housing needs in Nashville. I found that while there is no shortage of ideas of how to address our affordable housing shortage, there are very few organizations that are on the front lines of the affordable housing crisis doing the hard work every day like Rebuilding Together. It is what drew me to our organization and its what drives me to continue our absolutely critical work. We are not just repairing homes. We are preventing displacement and restoring the fabric of Nashville's changing neighborhoods. 
 
At the end of the day, I think there is no more greater investment as a community that we can make then restoring the homes of Nashville's long-term residents--helping them age in place and stay in the city they have called home. 
Programs
Description
The Safe and Healthy Home Improvement Program (SHHIP) specifically looks at health and safety needs in the home. We address accessibility issues, fall prevention, fire prevention and other pressing safety or health issues. 

Our purpose is to remove health and safety hazards in the homes of local low-income homeowners with a special focus on three populations: seniors, those with disabilities, and Veterans. We work to achieve our vision of a safe and healthy home for every person through direct home repairs and homeowner education.

Each home receives critical repairs according to each home’s uniquely tailored work scope aimed at ensuring the safety and health of the household. RTN provides these repairs through utilizing both volunteers as well as contractors on repairs requiring technical expertise, such as mechanical, plumbing, electrical, and roofing work. All of the work is completed with a special focus on making homes more accessible for aging homeowners.

Budget 420,000
Category Housing, General/Other Home Repair Programs
Population Served Elderly and/or Disabled, Other Named Groups, People/Families with of People with Disabilities
Short Term Success Of homes that get fall prevention measures, 75% report that our upgrades have prevented a fall.
Long term Success
After our repairs, 90% report feeling safer in their homes.
 
Program Success Monitored By
Homeowners self-report based on a survey given directly after the service is provided and then 6 months after service provided.
Examples of Program Success
We built a ramp for a homeowner so that she would be able to use her front door to get out of the home. Three days later, the home caught on fire and because of the ramp our homeowner was able to safely exit the home along with her homeowner. If we hadn't been able to build the ramp, our homeowner would have struggled to get out of the home with a very different outcome.
Description Through the Home Energy Savings (HES) program, we engage volunteers to improve the energy efficiency of homes through scopes of work such as insulating attics, sealing windows and doors, installing LED light bulbs and more. These improvements increase comfort and decrease utility costs, resulting in an average savings of $390 per year (according to utility bill analysis) per home. 
Budget $180,000
Category Environment, General/Other Energy Resources
Population Served People/Families with of People with Disabilities, Elderly and/or Disabled, Poor,Economically Disadvantaged,Indigent
CEO Comments Our biggest challenge is our large waitlist of homeowners who need our assistance. We currently have 200+ homeowners who meet our criteria but we lack the resources to serve immediately. 
Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. Edward Henley
Company Affiliation Pillars Development
Term July 2018 to June 2019
Email edward@pillarsdevelopment.com
Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Ms. Danetta Allen KraftCPAsVoting
Ms. Sarah Camperlino KraftCPAsVoting
Mr. Ed Henley Pillars Development, LLCVoting
Mrs. Megan Manly Village Real EstateVoting
Mr. Brandon Miller Wagon Wheel Title Voting
Mr. Kyle Mills American ConstructorsVoting
Mr. Jonathan Sexton Smith Gee StudioVoting
Mr. Adam Smith Gresham Smith PartnersNonVoting
Ms. Mary Melissa Taddeo Tuck-Hinton ArchitectsVoting
Mrs. Abby Tylor Encore Teacher, Robertson AcademyVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 13
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 6
Female 8
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 2
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 95%
Does the organization have written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Does the organization have a written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage of Board Members making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of Board Members making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Does the Board include Client Representation? No
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 14
Standing Committees
Executive
Finance
Program / Program Planning
Development / Fund Development / Fund Raising / Grant Writing / Major Gifts
Communications / Promotion / Publicity / Public Relations
Nominating
Risk Management Provisions
Risk Management Provisions
Accident and Injury Coverage
Directors and Officers Policy
Workers Compensation and Employers' Liability
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Professional Liability
Inland Marine and Mobile Equipment
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Mrs. Kaitlin Dastugue
Term Start Sept 2016
Email kaitlin@rebuildingtogethernashville.org
Experience

Prior to stepping into the role of Executive Director for Rebuilding Together Nashville, Kaitlin was the Planning and Policy Manager for the Metro Development and Housing Agency in Nashville. She has a degree Political Science from Emory University and a Master's Degree in City and Regional Planning from the University of Pennsylvania.

Former CEOs
NameTerm
Becky Carter Aug 2012 - May 2016
Ms. Laura Price -
Staff
Full Time Staff 2
Part Time Staff 0
Volunteers 2
Contractors 1
Retention Rate 100%
Plans & Policies
Does the organization have a documented Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Does the organization have an approved Strategic Plan? Yes
Number of years Strategic Plan Considers 3
When was Strategic Plan adopted? Jan 2018
In case of a change in leadership, is a Management Succession plan in place? Yes
Does the organization have a Policies and Procedures Plan? Yes
Does the organization have a Nondiscrimination Policy? Yes
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Affiliate/Chapter of National Organization (i.e. Girl Scouts of the USA, American Red Cross, etc.) - Affiliate/chapter1995
Center for Nonprofit Management (Nashville)2010
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Community Weather Hero AwardThe Weather Research Center and The Weather Museum2011
Certificate of Appreciation for Outstanding ServiceCitizens of River Plantation2011
Team Building AwardFrist Foundation - Salute to Excellence2012
CEO Comments We know that our ability serve our mission is directly correlated with the capacity of our staff. We hired a full-time Director of Programs in 2017. We additionally rely on two AmeriCorps volunteers annually to assist with our program delivery both in the field and through coordination. This year we will be hiring an additional AmeriCorps member to assist with our growing program. 
 
 
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2018
Fiscal Year End June 30 2019
Projected Revenue $685,000.00
Projected Expenses $683,578.00
Detailed Financials
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201720162015
Program Expense$119,495$212,143$283,824
Administration Expense$40,425$49,724$37,475
Fundraising Expense$22,388$20,410$25,024
Payments to Affiliates--$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.210.631.07
Program Expense/Total Expenses66%75%82%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue10%11%7%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201720162015
Total Assets$73,192$35,479$139,507
Current Assets$53,433$35,479$139,507
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$0$0$0
Total Net Assets$73,192$35,479$139,507
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201720162015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201720162015
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201720162015
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountFoundations and Corporations $129,928Contributions, Gifts and Grants $131,487Contributions, Gifts & Grants $329,412
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions, Gifts and Grants $55,481Government Grants $47,312Government Grants $42,400
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountLocal Government Grants $34,646 -- --
IRS Letter of Exemption
Capital Campaign
Is the organization currently conducting a Capital Campaign for an endowment or the purchase of a major asset? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit
TN Charitable Solicitations Registration Yes - Expires Dec 2018
Solicitations Permit
2018 State Solicitations Permit
Organization Comments


GivingMatters.com Financial Comments
Financial figures taken from 990.
990 was prepared by Bellenfant, PLLC.
Comments provided by Kathryn Bennett 2/27/18.
Nonprofit Rebuilding Together Nashville
Address 6101 Centennial Blvd.
Nashville, TN 37209
Primary Phone (615) 2973955 2
Contact Email rtnashville@gmail.com
CEO/Executive Director Mrs. Kaitlin Dastugue
Board Chair Mr. Edward Henley
Board Chair Company Affiliation Pillars Development
Year of Incorporation 1995
Former Names
Christmas In April - Nashville

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