Frist Art Museum
919 Broadway
Nashville TN 37203-3822
Mission Statement

The mission of the Frist Art Museum is to present and originate high-quality exhibitions with related educational programs and community outreach activities, and its vision is to inspire people through art to look at their world in new ways. As a window to the arts and culture of the world for Middle Tennesseans and visitors, the Frist Center exercises its core commitment to education and outreach through the visual arts by offering a place to learn, explore, wonder, and create. 

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Dr. Susan H. Edwards PhD
Board Chair Mr. William R. Frist
Board Chair Company Affiliation Frist Capital
History & Background
Year of Incorporation 1998
Former Names
Frist Center for the Visual Arts
Organization's type of tax exempt status 501-C3
Financial Summary
Graph: Expense Breakdown Graph - All Years
 
 
Projected Expenses $12,801,229.00
Projected Annual Revenue 12801229 (2018)
Statements
Mission

The mission of the Frist Art Museum is to present and originate high-quality exhibitions with related educational programs and community outreach activities, and its vision is to inspire people through art to look at their world in new ways. As a window to the arts and culture of the world for Middle Tennesseans and visitors, the Frist Center exercises its core commitment to education and outreach through the visual arts by offering a place to learn, explore, wonder, and create. 

Background

The Frist Center opened in 2001, is accredited by the American Alliance of Museums, and has been recognized nationally as a leader in the arts and in arts education. Today, we welcome approximately 200,000 visitors annually (which includes the gratis admission we offer to individuals age 18 and under and to Community Partners), and our membership exceeds 11,500 households from the surrounding area. As a noncollecting institution, the Frist Center devotes its resources not to the maintenance of a permanent collection but to the educational enrichment of Middle Tennessee’s children and families of all socioeconomic backgrounds.

We present 12–15 exhibitions a year, featuring works by regional, national, and international artists and dating from antiquity to the present. Exhibitions are supplemented with public programs, such as gallery talks; lectures by artists, curators, and art historians; symposia; films; live music; exhibition tours; free admission days; discounted admission and free concerts for senior citizens on Senior Mondays; free Family Festival Days and College Nights; and art-making workshops and demonstrations.

The Frist Center prioritizes community outreach through relationships with 60-plus Community Partners and Art Trunks, which deliver our resources directly to nontraditional museum audiences’ doorsteps, removing barriers that may limit their use of the facility and its many assets. This service benefits individuals of all abilities, ages, genders, and nationalities with special consideration to pre- and after-school students, English Language Learners, and senior citizens. The Frist Center also offers a variety of professional development opportunities and exhibition-related guides to educators as they prepare their students for a site visit. For K-12 students, FCVA organizes a variety of school-focused tours, programs, and activities by age group and content appropriateness.

For teens and tweens, ARTlab offers young artists an opportunity to experiment with media alongside practicing artists. For children, the Frist Center offers summer art camps and Artful Tales, a captivating story time usually related to a current exhibition and followed by an opportunity to explore the Martin ArtQuest Gallery, the Frist Center’s award-winning interactive and educational space for visitors of all ages to learn about art.
Impact

In the past year, the Frist Center has presented a wide range of exhibitions featuring various media and regarding diverse cultures. Highlights from 2017 include the following exhibitions and their programs:

1) Secrets of Buddhist Art: Tibet, Japan, and Korea

2)  State of the Art: Discovering American Art Now

3) Irving Penn: Beyond Beauty

4) World War I and American Art

5) Ancestral Modern: Australian Aboriginal Arts from the Kaplan and Levi Collection
 
6) Nick Cave: FEAT. 
 

The Gordon Contemporary Artists Project Gallery is dedicated to contemporary art in a variety of media and experimental techniques. Featured artists included Claire Morgan and Vadis Turner. The free Conte Community Gallery featured Pattern Recognition: Art and Music Videos in Middle Tennessee, an exhibition bringing together video and digital photographs by local artists, and  Extrasensory, a community art exhibition created in collaboration with contemporary artist Nick Cave.

Education is at the heart of everything we do at the Frist. For adults, self- and docent-guided tours, workshops, lectures, Art After Dark events, and more are available to supplement exhibitions. For younger students, Artful Tales is a fun storytelling related to a current exhibition with a hands-on studio component. Teens and tweens participate in ARTlab, a chance to test new art media alongside practicing artists. Experiential learning opportunities are available through job shadowing, as well as capstone projects in which staff members collaborate with individual students to explore research projects of their own choosing.

Goals for 2018:

1) Be recognized as the leading visual arts resource in the Mid South

2) Enhance the art experience

3) Invest in marketing the Frist Center as a cultural hub

4) Assure the organizational and financial sustainability

Needs
  • Increased membership
  • Flexible volunteers
  • Increased contributed revenue to support community outreach and education programs
Other ways to donate, support, or volunteer

It is through the generous support of members, corporate sponsors, foundations, and individuals that the Frist Center is able to present a wide array of world-class art exhibitions and related programs. Donations are accepted online at http://fristcenter.org/join-support/donate, or may be mailed to:

Frist Art Museum
c/o Crystal Churchwell
919 Broadway
Nashville, TN 37203

Donations are also accepted via phone. Call Crystal Churchwell at (615) 744-3341.

Visit http://fristcenter.org/join-support/get-involved to learn more about the following giving opportunities:

Membership: Members make museums! Become a member today and enjoy an array of special benefits including free admission.

Sponsorship: Enjoy the marketing recognition and hospitality benefits associated with corporate sponsorship.

Annual Fund: Your gift to the Annual Fund ensures a future of creating, discovering, inspiring and changing lives in our community through art.

Frist Gala: The Frist Center’s annual black-tie event supports our education and outreach programs. The 2017 Frist Gala will be held on Saturday, April 22.

Art Deco Society: The Art Deco Society is a giving society created to support the ongoing care and maintenance of the Frist’s historic building. It is a lasting way to leave a legacy or to give an annual gift designated to help maintain the building as a vibrant gathering place for future generations to enjoy. 
 
Volunteer: Not only is the Frist Center’s volunteer program a great way to support the arts in our community, but it’s the perfect way to meet interesting people just like you. 

TAC Specialty License Plates: Support the Tennessee Arts Commission through your purchase of one of four Tennessee specialty license plates or give a specialty tag as a gift through the Gift-A-Tag voucher program. TAC provides funding and support through its grant program to the Frist Center as well as arts organizations throughout Tennessee.

Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Art Museums
Areas of Service
Areas Served
TN - Cheatham
TN - Davidson
TN - Dickson
TN - Robertson
TN - Rutherford
TN - Sumner
TN - Hickman
TN - Williamson
TN - Wilson
TN - Macon
TN - Cannon
TN - Maury
TN - Smith
TN - Trousdale
The Frist Center primarily serves the Middle Tennessee, Southern Kentucky, and Northern Alabama regions, though we advertise statewide and nationally.
CEO Statement
At the Frist, we recognize that the impact of arts and cultural institutions is incalculable. Many turn to quantifiable statistics such as attendance as a benchmark of success; however, the contribution of art to the social fabric of a community is often latent, yet more enduring. Attending an exhibition, a lecture, a workshop, or a public program can intrigue, inform, and inspire. It is often in retrospect that the subtle messages of art are revealed to us. 
 
Visual art is a means of communication, one that speaks to visitors of all ages from the novice to the sophisticate. Aesthetic pleasure is but one characteristic of art, and much art is neither beautiful nor pleasurable. It often provokes or enlightens, yet these responses also communicate strong feelings. The power of art resides not in its simplicity but rather in its complexity and its implicit internal tension.

The imagination is sparked not only by seeing art first-hand but also by investigating the ambiguous intentions of the artist. Educators at the Frist design programs and activities that stimulate a greater awareness of spatial orientation, sequence, color, line, and metaphor. This insight can be applied to a variety of interdisciplinary subjects from geometry to poetry. Moreover, art-related programs available at the Frist stimulate the imagination and suggest possibilities previously overlooked.

Because the Frist is committed to bringing the best of the world’s art to Middle Tennessee, visitors of all ages and socioeconomic groups can experience the diversity of the international community without leaving home. Finding common ground in an increasingly interconnected world has greater and greater relevance. By presenting exhibitions drawn from the community, the region, the nation, and the world, the Frist opens doors to a life of the mind and unlimited possibilities.

Programs
Description

Adult programs bring a variety of insights to exhibitions through lectures, films, hands-on workshops, and guided tours. Perspectives from critics, artists, scholars, collectors, and curators set the context for exhibitions and inspire visitors to look at their world in different ways. Music programs—Frist Fridays, Music in the Cafe, and holiday concerts—are additional ways to enrich the programs and exhibitions at the Frist Center. Hands-on workshops encourage creativity and lead to individualized avenues by which to connect with the exhibitions.

Budget 32000
Category Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other General Arts Education
Population Served Adults, ,
Short Term Success Short-term success is quantitatively measured by both finances and attendance. Qualitative measures include participants' written evaluations and comments.
Long term Success Each program is designed to support the successful fulfillment of the Frist Center’s mission and vision to change people’s lives through art. Programs must align with the Center’s strategic plan and annual implementation plan.
Program Success Monitored By

An increase in attendance and sponsorship from previous years is a quantitative way to measure the success of the programs. The evaluation process also includes qualitative feedback through internal and external groups, including:

· Post-program staff meetings

· Focus groups

· Pre- and post-visit surveys via online evaluations

All progress is reported in the implementation plan on a quarterly basis and submitted to the Board of Trustees.

Examples of Program Success

Multisensory kits, which contain various materials and scents related to an exhibition that benefits visitors of all abilities, were initiated in 2015 with tours of Ink, Silk, and Gold: Islamic Art from the Fine Arts Museum, Boston, and continue as part of our regularly scheduled programming.

2016 program highlights include a European portrait studio workshop led by Quinton Creasy and the performance “All the World’s a Stage: Drama in the Galleries” with the Nashville Shakespeare Festival for Treasures from the House of Alba: 500 Years of Art and Collecting; a three-day “Photographic Language: Analog” studio workshop with Vesna Pavlović and Nashville Community Darkroom and a film series “Revolution and Realism: Films of the Soviet Union” in collaboration with International Lens and Light + Sound Machine at Third Man Records for The Power of Pictures: Early Soviet Photography and Film; and an expert panel discussion and an in-garage restoration master class for Bellissima! The Italian Automotive Renaissance, 1945–1975.

In partnership with Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood, and Government Relations, the "Food for Thought" three-part lunch-and-lecture series is currently being held this fall in conjunction with the respective exhibitions Women, Art, and Social Change: The Newcomb Pottery Enterprise; Samurai: The Way of the Warrior; and Ragnar Kjartansson: The Visitors. The adult programs reach over 5,000 participants.

Description

The Frist Center serves educators through workshops, school system in-services, and other meetings as part of community engagement efforts. Educators examine original works of art and participate in gallery discussions and studio activities. Teachers receive instructional materials for use in classrooms. This program includes subsidized transportation for schools and free admission for children ages 18 and younger.

Budget 22000
Category Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other General Arts Education
Population Served Adults, ,
Short Term Success Short-term success is quantitatively measured by both finances and attendance. Qualitative measures include participants' written evaluations and comments.
Long term Success Each program is designed to support the successful fulfillment of the Frist Center’s mission and vision to change people’s lives through art. Programs must align with the Center’s strategic plan and annual implementation plan.
Program Success Monitored By Measures of success include number of schools touring the exhibitions, an increase in student/teacher attendance, and retention rate for teachers and schools. We also gather completed evaluations from teachers, professional experts, and educator workshop participants. All progress is reported in the implementation plan and submitted to the Board of Trustees and Education Council.
Examples of Program Success

More than 7,000 students and chaperones have visited the Frist Center for either self- or docent-guided tours as of October 2016. Educator programs have served approximately 4,500 educators, parents, and children through educator workshops and the school system art shows.

Description

Art Trunks are mobile kits designed to enrich appreciation and understanding of present and past art exhibitions at the Frist Center. Each Art Trunk has a theme and includes reproductions of artwork, guided lessons, and materials for three sessions. The Art Trunk program provides workshops to acquaint Community Partner organizations with the exhibitions and art lessons. Each Art Trunk culminates with a docent-led tour of the exhibition and offers the following outcomes:

  • Unique opportunities for Community Partners to become more informed about works of art
  • A greater understanding and appreciation of art
  • Increased questioning, comparison, and observation strategies
Budget 6000
Category Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other General Arts Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years), Adults, Families
Short Term Success Short-term success is quantitatively measured by both finances and attendance. Qualitative measures include participants' written evaluations and comments.
Long term Success Each program is designed to support the successful fulfillment of the Frist Center’s mission and vision to change people’s lives through art. Programs must align with the Center’s strategic plan and annual implementation plan.
Program Success Monitored By

Progress is monitored by evaluations completed by Community Partners, colleagues, and professionals. In addition to written evaluations, we request and consider feedback from a Community Partner advisory group. All progress is reported in the implementation plan and submitted to the Board of Trustees and Community Marketing and Outreach Council.

Examples of Program Success

The Art Trunk program reaches more than 3,500 individuals through the mobile kits and community fairs and festivals. 2016 has included Art Trunks based on the exhibitions Treasures from the House of Alba: 500 Years of Art and Collecting and Women, Art, and Social Change: The Newcomb Pottery Enterprise.

Description
Programs include free Family Festival Days related to current exhibitions throughout the year, Artful Tales (a monthly story-time program), hands-on workshops, and opportunities for youth to engage with art. The Martin ArtQuest Gallery, popular among all visitors, is an interactive, hands-on gallery that encourages visitors to explore, create, and discuss art and that presents the related one-minute, Emmy® Award-winning television series, "ArtQuest: Art Is All Around You." 
 
Experiential learning occurs in the form of speakers, site visits, and job shadowing, as well as support for capstone senior projects that each MNPS student must complete for graduation.
Budget 46000
Category Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other General Arts Education
Population Served Children and Youth (0 - 19 years), Families,
Short Term Success Short-term success is quantitatively measured by both finances and attendance. Qualitative measures include participants' written evaluations and comments.
Long term Success Each program is designed to support the successful fulfillment of the Frist Center’s mission and vision to change people’s lives through art. Programs must align with the Center’s strategic plan and annual implementation plan.
Program Success Monitored By

Measures of program success include attendance to Martin ArtQuest Gallery, Family Festival Days, and Artful Tales; visits to FristKids.org; and viewers of "ArtQuest: Art Is All Around You" TV series. All progress is reported in the implementation plan and submitted to the Board of Trustees and Education Council.

Examples of Program Success

More than 68,000 visitors of all ages visit ArtQuest annually. Family Festival Days are another mainstay of our youth and family program. The Frist Center offers these free admission days two to three times per year (each attracting approximately 1,000 visitors), and they are accompanied by hands-on art-making activities and live music and demonstrations. Earlier this year, a Family Day focused on Treasures from the House of Alba, and in November 2016, one will focus on Samurai: The Way of the Warrior with a Matsuriza Taiko Drummers demonstration, Artful Tales, and a warrior flags art-making activity.

Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. William R. Frist
Company Affiliation Frist Capital
Term Jan 2018 to Dec 2018
Email bfrist@fristcapital.com
Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Mrs. Jean Ann Baker Community VolunteerVoting
Mr. H. Lee Barfield IIBass, Berry & Sims, PLCVoting
Mr. Clay Blevins Voting
Mrs. Laura Chadwick Community VolunteerVoting
Mrs. Karyn M. Frist Community VolunteerVoting
Mr. William (Billy) R. Frist Frist CapitalVoting
Mr. Frank Garrison Overton Capital, LLCVoting
Mr. Howard Gentry Office of Criminal Court ClerkVoting
Mr. Bob Gordon Morgan Stanley, The BGS GroupVoting
Ms. Claire Gulmi Envision HealthcareVoting
Mr. James Harbison Metropolitan Development & Housing AgencyVoting
Mr. Aubrey Harwell Jr.Neal & Harwell, PLCVoting
Dr. Melvin N. Johnson D.B.A.Tennessee State UniversityVoting
Mr. Kenneth J. Melkus Welsh, Carson, Anderson & StoweVoting
Mr. Stephen S. Riven Avondale PartnersVoting
Mr. John Smithwick Voting
Mr. Joe N. Steakley Hospital Corporation of AmericaVoting
Ms. Deborah E. Story ECS Group, Inc.Voting
Ms. Deborah E. Story Voting
Mr. Jay Turner Marketstreet EnterprisesVoting
Mrs. Julie W. Walker Community VolunteerVoting
Mrs. Gail P. Carr Williams Vanderbilt UniversityVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 19
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 14
Female 7
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 85%
Does the organization have written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Does the organization have a written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage of Board Members making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of Board Members making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Does the Board include Client Representation? Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 4
Standing Committees
Communications / Public Relations
Community Outreach / Community Relations
Development / Fund Raising
Education
Executive
Finance
Human Resources / Personnel
Marketing
Risk Management Provisions
Commercial General Liability
Disability Insurance
Employee Benefits Liability
Exhibit Liability
Life Insurance
Medical Health Insurance
Special Event Liability
Workers Compensation & Employers' Liability
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Dr. Susan H. Edwards PhD
Term Start July 2004
Email sedwards@fristcenter.org
Experience
In addition to her duties as Executive Director & CEO of the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Susan Edwards originates exhibitions, publishes and lectures on modern and contemporary art and photography. Edwards received her PhD from the City University of New York in 1995, with a dissertation on Ben Shahn’s photography. She was previously employed as the Director of the Katonah Museum of Art, NY; curator at Hunter College in New York City; and as curatorial assistant at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. 

Edwards has taught the history of art, with adjunct positions at New York University, Queens College of the City University of New York, Pace University, Stern College of Yeshiva University, School of Visual Arts, New York, and Vanderbilt University. Edwards has lectured at Harvard University, College of William & Mary, Montserrat College of Art, Whitman College, and International Center of Photography in New York. Edwards is the author of numerous essays on established artists, material culture, and photography including A Debate on Abstraction; Ben Shahn and the Task of Photography in Thirties America, The Amazing Grace of the Gullah People, Horse Tales: American Images and Icons, 1800-2000, and The Influence of Anxiety: Painting the Figure in Cold War America. She has contributed essays to exhibition catalogues, national and international periodicals and served as Guest Editor for a special issue on electronic photography for the Oxford University Journal History of Photography in 1998.

In 1997 Edwards was named a Founding Fellow at the Liguria Study Center for the Arts & Humanities, Genoa, Italy. She currently serves on the advisory boards of the Bogliasco Foundation, Harvard University Art Museums Collections Committee, and the Stephen Taller Archive at Harvard University. In 2011, Edwards was appointed Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Artes and des Lettres by the French Government.

Former CEOs
NameTerm
Mr. Chase Rynd Feb 1999 - July 2003
Staff
Full Time Staff 69
Part Time Staff 8
Volunteers 275
Contractors 4
Retention Rate 77%
Plans & Policies
Does the organization have a documented Fundraising Plan? Yes
Does the organization have an approved Strategic Plan? Yes
Number of years Strategic Plan Considers 5
When was Strategic Plan adopted? Jan 2012
In case of a change in leadership, is a Management Succession plan in place? Yes
Does the organization have a Policies and Procedures Plan? Yes
Does the organization have a Nondiscrimination Policy? Yes
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
American Association of Museums2001
Center for Nonprofit Management Excellence Network2001
Tennesseans for the Arts2001
Americans for the Arts2001
Nashville Arts Coalition2007
CABLE2015
Catholic Charities USA2006
Metro Arts Commission2004
Metro Parks and Recreation2000
National Endowment for the Arts2004
YMCA of Middle Tennessee2007
Vanderbilt University2004
Alignment Nashville2007
Nashville Public Television2012
Nashville Public Library2000
External Assessments and Accreditations
External Assessments and Accreditations
Assessment/AccreditationYear
American Association of Museums - 10 Year Accreditation2016
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Emmy Award/Children's programming-ArtQuest: Art is All Around YouMid-South Chapter of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences2015
The Best of Tennessee Readers’ Choice Awards: Favorite Art Gallery (Middle Tennessee region)The Tennessee Magazine2015
Best Art GalleryThe Tennessean2015
Exhibition Campaign – Publication Competition Silver Award for 30 AmericansSoutheastern Museums Conference2015
Audio-Visual Audio Tours: Sanctity Pictured; Temporary Exhibition: Sanctity Pictured; Special Event: Bollard Decoration Project; Publication Special/Novelty: Sanctity Pictured Symposium PosterTennessee Association of Museums2015
Best MuseumNashville Scene2015
Certificate of ExcellenceTrip Advisor2015
ACE/Mercers’ International Book Award: Shortlisted, Sanctity Pictured catalogue authored by Trinita KennedyArt and Christianity Enquiry (ACE)2015
Catalog/Publication: Institutional budget between $4 and $20 million: Honorable Mention, Trinita Kennedy for Sanctity Pictured: The Art of the Dominican and Franciscan Orders in Renaissance ItalyThe Association of Art Museum Curators2015
Museum Educator of the Year: Shaun GilesTennessee Art Education Association2015
Best of 2015 Exhibitions: Phantom Bodies: The Human Aura in Art; Best of 2015 Movers & Shakers: Mark ScalaBURNAWAY.org: The Voice of Art in the South2015
Honorable Mention, Mark Scala for Phantom Bodies: The Human Aura in ArtAssociation of Art Museum Curators: Awards for Excellence2016
Top 20 places to take kids in NashvilleKIDS OUT AND ABOUT.COM2016
Honorable Mention for Phantom Bodies catalogue; Honorable Mention, for Treasures from the House of Alba gallery guideSoutheastern Museums Conference – Publications category2016
Best Art Gallery; Best Museum; Best Historical Exhibition for The Power of Pictures: Early Soviet Photography and Film; Second Place for Best Place to Take Kids When it’s Raining categoryNashville Scene2016
Senior Staff
Title Director of Education & Outreach
Experience/Biography

Anne Henderson founded the Education Department at the Frist Center when the museum opened in 2001 and has overseen it ever since. She earned a B.A. in English from Baker University and a M.A. in art history from the University of Texas at Austin. From 1985 to 1990 she was Curator of Education at the Meadows Museum at Southern Methodist University, and from 1991 to 2000 she was Head of Teacher and School Programs at the National Gallery of Art. At the Frist Center she supervises all the education programming for adults, youth and families, volunteers, and teachers through workshops, lectures, film series, tours, exhibition materials, outreach programs, and the award-winning interactive education gallery Martin ArtQuest. Henderson has presented at the conferences for the American Association of Museums, the Institute of Museum and Library Services Web-Wise seminar, the J.P. Getty Museum symposium on interactive galleries, and the Tennessee Association of Museums conference. She has also served on various grant panels for the Institute of Museum and Library Services. In 2010 Henderson was named National Art Museum Educator of the Year by the National Art Education Association.

Title Director of Communications and Community Relations
Experience/Biography Ellen Jones Pryor currently serves as Director of Communications and Community Relations at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts. A resident of Middle Tennessee for more than 35 years, in addition to the arts, her professional experience includes work in government, tourism, politics, banking, journalism, the music business (including classical, jazz, country and world music), book publishing, and television and film production. She is on the board of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Mid-South Region and serves on the Keyboard of the Blair School of Music at Vanderbilt University, the Community Advisory Boards of WFSK-FM and the Advisory Board of the Brooks Fund of the Community Foundation.
Title Chief Curator
Experience/Biography

Mark Scala is the Chief Curator and head of the exhibitions department at the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, in Nashville, where he has been employed since 2000. Before coming to Nashville, Scala was employed at the Art Museum of Western Virginia, where he worked as both curator and educator for ten years. He was a regional editor and critic for New Art Examiner from 1985-1990. Before that, he was director of the University of Richmond’s Marsh Gallery, and taught studio art at Virginia Commonwealth University, University of Richmond, and Randolph-Macon College. Scala received his MA in art history, Museum Studies emphasis, in 1988 and MFA in painting in 1979, both from Virginia Commonwealth University. He is currently a member of the Association of Art Museum Curators.


Title Head Designer
Experience/Biography

Hans Schmitt-Matzen graduated summa cum laude from Middle Tennessee State University with a BFA in 2003. Schmitt-Matzen joined the Frist Center for the Visual Arts staff in 2004 as a preparator in the exhibitions department. In 2016 he assumed the role of Head Designer and leads the design team.

Title Associate Director of Development
Experience/Biography

Crystal A. Churchwell is a graduate of Wellesley College and has a Master of Business Administration from Vanderbilt University’s Owen Graduate School of Management. Churchwell serves as the Associate Director of Development for the Frist Center for the Visual Arts, overseeing the development efforts and initiatives for the museum. She has served in a brand management capacity for several Fortune 500 companies, partnering to lead their multi-national brands to expansion and growth.

Churchwell is also engaged with the community through her after-school participation with Harvest Hands Community Center.
Title Human Resources Manager
Experience/Biography
Sheri Horn is a Human Resources professional with over 35 years of experience in the for-profit and non-profit industries.
 
 
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2018
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2018
Projected Revenue $12,801,229.00
Projected Expenses $12,801,229.00
Endowment Spending Policy Percentage
Endowment Spending Percentage (if selected) 4%
Detailed Financials
Revenue and ExpensesHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Revenue$13,451,040$12,300,376$12,855,690
Total Expenses$14,180,656$14,170,249$14,256,145
Revenue Less Expenses($729,616)($1,869,873)($1,400,455)
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$1,446,305$1,298,766$1,251,226
Government Contributions$0$0$0
Federal$0$0$0
State$0$0$0
Local$0$0$0
Unspecified$0$0$0
Individual Contributions$7,035,749$6,771,768$6,836,290
$0$0$0
$1,477,676$1,073,807$1,179,273
Investment Income, Net of Losses$106,355($35,723)$97,235
Membership Dues$1,389,355$1,343,300$1,402,660
Special Events$977,625$910,152$985,281
Revenue In-Kind$0$0$0
Other$1,017,975$938,306$0
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$11,321,938$11,408,155$11,276,954
Administration Expense$2,143,938$2,039,869$1,838,976
Fundraising Expense$714,780$722,225$848,583
Payments to Affiliates--$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.950.870.90
Program Expense/Total Expenses80%81%79%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue8%8%9%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$22,636,368$23,301,186$25,326,079
Current Assets$2,453,647$1,897,029$1,342,821
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$1,290,760$1,200,962$1,353,602
Total Net Assets$21,345,608$22,100,224$26,774,154
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities1.901.580.99
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions, Gifts, and Grants $7,035,749Contributions, Gifts and Grants $6,771,768Contributions, Gifts and Grants $6,836,290
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountProgram Revenue $1,477,676Membership Dues $1,343,300Membership Dues $1,402,660
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountFoundations and Corporations $1,446,305Foundations and Corporations $1,298,766Support from Visual Arts Foundation $1,251,226
IRS Letter of Exemption
Capital Campaign
Is the organization currently conducting a Capital Campaign for an endowment or the purchase of a major asset? No
Capital Campaign Goal $0.00
Capital Campaign Raised-to-Date Amount 0 as of
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit
TN Charitable Solicitations Registration Yes - Expires Sept 2018
Registration No
Organization Comments The Frist Center operates fiscally on a calendar year. Audits are generally completed by the end of April, and Form 990s are completed around October of each year.
GivingMatters.com Financial Comments
Financial figures taken from the audit.
Some foundation and corporation donations may be included with individual donations sum, as figures are not fully separated in financial documents.
The Frist Center for the Visual Arts' endowment is housed at The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee. 
Financials completed by Faulkner, Mackie & Cochran P.C.
Comment provided by Nicole Rose 02/07/2018. 
Nonprofit Frist Art Museum
Address 919 Broadway
Nashville, TN 37203 3822
Primary Phone (615) 244-3340
Contact Email kboyer@fristcenter.org
CEO/Executive Director Dr. Susan H. Edwards PhD
Board Chair Mr. William R. Frist
Board Chair Company Affiliation Frist Capital
Year of Incorporation 1998
Former Names
Frist Center for the Visual Arts

Related Information

Cultural and Ethnic Diversity

The United States stands out among nations as a melting pot of cultures and ethnicities. Demographers predict that by 2050, no single majority group will exist in the United States. Diversity is a key part of Middle Tennessee’s past, present and future. Nashville, especially, is a model of the American "melting pot," with an active Native American population, thriving Hispanic community and growing Middle Eastern and Asian presence. Different cultures, religions, ideas and customs come together harmoniously in Music City.