« Back to Search Results
Reviewed

FINDINGbalance, Inc.

Last Updated: 3/31/2014 5:26:15 PM

Nonprofit

FINDINGbalance, Inc.

Address

PO Box 284


Franklin, TN 37065-
Williamson County

Primary Phone

(615) 599-6948

Primary Fax

(615) 807-3205

Facebook

Visit us on Facebook

twitter

Visit us on Facebook

CEO/Executive Director

Mrs. Constance Lynn Rhodes

Board Chair

Ms. Beverly Bartsch Wilson

Board Chair Company Affiliation

Self-employed Accountant

Board Members

View

Year of Incorporation

2008

Former Names

Clinicians, authors and worshipART guests from our 2012 conference.
Clinicians, authors and worshipART guests from our 2012 conference.

Please click the arrow only once to play the organization's video.If the arrow is double clicked,YouTube's website will be launched.

Overview

To be the leading Christian resource for DAILY help with eating and body image issues.

More Background

Programs

FINDINGbalance Gathering

Online Video Library

Hungry for Hope

More Than a Number Community Events

Lasting Freedom

View Program Details

Financials

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.

Projected Revenue

$186,702

Projected Expenses

$174,356

View Financial Details


Share |

Related Information

Addiction & Substance Abuse

For every $1 spent on addiction treatment, $12 are saved on future social, medical and criminal justice costs. Yet addiction recovery services for low-income and uninsured people are provided primarily by nonprofit treatment centers dependent on funding through competitive grants, private donations and modest payment by patients. These centers are always busy, and patient waiting lists are long.

Mental Health and Mental Illness

“I’ve never shared my story with anybody.” -- The first step toward recovery can be the most difficult. The ability to engage in productive activities, to find relationships with other people fulfilling, and to adapt to change and cope with adversity are each vital to enjoying a happy and healthy life. But each of these facilities can be significantly impaired by mental health disorders. A mental health diagnosis should not define who a person is, or what a person can achieve through treatment and support. Middle Tennessee nonprofit organizations are ready to help make that first step toward good health a little easier.

Public Health

The dramatic achievements of public health in the 20th century have improved our quality of life in a myriad of ways, including an increase in life expectancy, worldwide reduction of infant and child mortality rates, and the elimination or reduction of many communicable diseases. In Middle Tennessee, improvements in preventive medicine and advanced medical technology have resulted in increased life expectancy and improved health for many residents. However, significant health disparities exist in our region, resulting in poor health status often related to economic status, race, and/or gender.

Tennessee Women's Health Report Card

"Women in Tennessee are in the middle of a health crisis. What are YOU going to do?" Dr. Stephaine Walker's call to action followed the launch of the TN Women's Health Report Card, which showed some clear areas of progress since the previous snapshot of women's health in our state, but also a number of areas in which there is still significant work to be done. While we are getting more mammograms and have significantly decreased our rates of breast and lung cancers, for example, cervical cancer rates have increased, and 42% of Tennessee's women have high blood pressure. Almost 1 in 5 of us smoked while we were pregnant, and 1 in 3 of us are obese. African American women experience striking disparities in rates of breast cancer, STD contraction, and infant mortality. The full 2013 report can be accessed through the link below. Read carefully, and decide what YOU are going to do to improve the health of women in Tennessee.

Gangs

In Tennessee, gang presence has been on the rise since the late 1980s and early 1990s, when gangs first made a concerted push into the state. Since 2011, police have identified at least 5,000 gang members in Davidson County, and gang-related crimes have increased by 25%. Meanwhile, cities with 50,000 or fewer inhabitants have seen gang-related crimes triple in frequency nationally since 2005.