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Habitat for Humanity of Williamson County

Last Updated: 3/18/2014 11:17:18 AM

Nonprofit

Habitat for Humanity of Williamson County

Address

511 West Meade Boulevard


Franklin, TN 37064-
Williamson County

Primary Phone

(615) 690-8090

Primary Fax

(615) 690-8097

Facebook

Visit us on Facebook

CEO/Executive Director

Becket Moore

Board Chair

Brian Smith

Board Chair Company Affiliation

The LPS Group Morgan Stanley Wealth Management

Board Members

View

Year of Incorporation

1992

Former Names

Women Build 2012
Women Build 2012

Overview

 

Habitat for Humanity of Williamson County (HFHWC), a faith-based organization, seeks to put God’s Love into action by partnering with communities to build affordable housing, inspire hope and life-changing stability for families through home ownership.

More Background

Programs

Building homes

ReStore

Homebuyers Education

Volunteer and donor participation

View Program Details

Financials

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.

Projected Revenue

$2,335,357

Projected Expenses

$1,881,170

View Financial Details


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