Tennessee CASA Association Inc
412 Golden Bear Court
Suite B202
Murfreesboro TN 37128
There are 20,000 children in Tennessee in need each year. Someone has to be for the child. Why not you?
Mission Statement
The mission of the Tennessee CASA Association is to support, develop, expand and unite local CASA programs in recruiting and training volunteers to advocate for Tennessee's abused and neglected children.

The mission of serving the network of 29 local CASA programs serving 52 counties is demonstrated by the following ways.  

1. Tennessee CASA offers customized training and technical assistance which is beneficial to all staff and volunteers in the local program network.

2.   2.  Tennessee CASA lends credibility to local programs as many advocates and community leaders want to know that local programs have an affiliation with a statewide organization.

3.    3.  State funding is critical to local CASA programs and any increase in that funding can be directly linked to the work that Tennessee CASA does with the state of Tennessee.

4.    4.   The tech support and quality assurance offered by Tennessee CASA saves time, and therefore money, for the local organizations ensuring that they comply with funder expectations.

5.    5.  Tennessee CASA is well respected statewide and on a national level. The relationship with the Tennessee General Assembly, statewide organizations, and National CASA benefits the local programs on many levels, i.e., child welfare policies and trends; new initiatives such as ACEs; cutting edge research in serving children; and being the “voice at the table” on behalf of children and families served by CASA.

6.     6.  The growth and expansion of current programs and newly developing CASA programs in additional counties would not be possible without Tennessee CASA. Tennessee CASA ensures that programs are strong and sustainable, providing quality advocacy for abused children with responsible nonprofit management.

  7.  Tennessee CASA provides strategies and materials to coordinate a statewide volunteer recruitment and public awareness campaign. 

Basically, Tennessee CASA strives to provide the local network with training and administrative resources so they can devote their funding to the direct service of advocating for abused children. Furthermore, Tennessee CASA does not participate in traditional fundraising to avoid competition with the efforts of the local programs.

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Lynne Farrar
Board Chair Maggie Bahou
Board Chair Company Affiliation Hospice Compassus
History & Background
Year of Incorporation 1991
Organization's type of tax exempt status 501-C3
Financial Summary
Graph: Expense Breakdown Graph - All Years
 
 
Projected Expenses $454,721.00
Projected Annual Revenue $454,721.00 (2018)
Statements
Mission
The mission of the Tennessee CASA Association is to support, develop, expand and unite local CASA programs in recruiting and training volunteers to advocate for Tennessee's abused and neglected children.

The mission of serving the network of 29 local CASA programs serving 52 counties is demonstrated by the following ways.  

1. Tennessee CASA offers customized training and technical assistance which is beneficial to all staff and volunteers in the local program network.

2.   2.  Tennessee CASA lends credibility to local programs as many advocates and community leaders want to know that local programs have an affiliation with a statewide organization.

3.    3.  State funding is critical to local CASA programs and any increase in that funding can be directly linked to the work that Tennessee CASA does with the state of Tennessee.

4.    4.   The tech support and quality assurance offered by Tennessee CASA saves time, and therefore money, for the local organizations ensuring that they comply with funder expectations.

5.    5.  Tennessee CASA is well respected statewide and on a national level. The relationship with the Tennessee General Assembly, statewide organizations, and National CASA benefits the local programs on many levels, i.e., child welfare policies and trends; new initiatives such as ACEs; cutting edge research in serving children; and being the “voice at the table” on behalf of children and families served by CASA.

6.     6.  The growth and expansion of current programs and newly developing CASA programs in additional counties would not be possible without Tennessee CASA. Tennessee CASA ensures that programs are strong and sustainable, providing quality advocacy for abused children with responsible nonprofit management.

  7.  Tennessee CASA provides strategies and materials to coordinate a statewide volunteer recruitment and public awareness campaign. 

Basically, Tennessee CASA strives to provide the local network with training and administrative resources so they can devote their funding to the direct service of advocating for abused children. Furthermore, Tennessee CASA does not participate in traditional fundraising to avoid competition with the efforts of the local programs.

Background History of Tennessee CASA Association (TN CASA)
Tennessee CASA was incorporated in December 1988 to help strengthen the CASA network statewide. At that time, there were 10 local CASA programs serving 10 counties throughout Tennessee. In 1992, TN CASA received its first grant from the National CASA Association which provided financial stability for the organization. Three years later, 13 CASA programs served 13 counties and in the following year, the first executive director for Tennessee CASA was hired. This produced considerable growth with a full-time director and active board in place. The TN CASA Network continued to grow in part with the help of additional funds being made available to CASA programs through the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth. As of November 2017, there are 29 CASA programs that serve 52 counties across the state. A strategic goal of Tennessee CASA is to expand CASA into counties that do not have a CASA program so every child who is abused or neglected may know the safe embrace of a loving family.
 
Tennessee CASA Today

Tennessee CASA is a member of the National CASA Association and adheres to their standards for state programs. TN CASA’s main role is to provide technical assistance to new and existing programs to ensure quality services to children.   The agency also provides training opportunities for the entire CASA Network including an annual state conference in May. Each year, TN CASA coordinates CASA Day on the Hill so that local programs can communicate with state legislators on the need for CASA programs.   There is a strong emphasis on community collaboration and TN CASA is active on many committees including the the Children’s Justice Task Force, Court Improvement Committee for the Administrative Office of the Court, TN Young Child Wellness Council, Children's Advisory Council, Youth Transitions Advisory Council, Council on Children's Mental Health and the TCCY Mid-Cumberland Council on Children and Youth. 

The TN CASA staff is comprised of an executive director, a program services coordinator, a data analyst/marketing coordinator, an expansion coordinator and a quality assurance coordinator. The Board of Directors, which meets quarterly, is comprised of 6 community members and 4 CASA executive directors representing local CASA programs for a total of 10 voting members. The Board strives to achieve diversity in both staffing and board membership and actively seeks committed board members from across the state with diverse backgrounds.

Impact
Accomplishments: As of June 30, 2017, the Tennessee CASA network served over 5,200 children at a median cost per child of $842 (below the national median cost of $1,190). 29 local CASA programs serving 52 counties in Tennessee recruited, trained, and supervised 1,670 CASA volunteers for a total of 133,142 hours served. This represents a value of $2,950,427 in hours served (based on $22.16 value of volunteer time per hour in Tennessee, according to www.independentsector.org). The impact of CASA on behalf of the children for whom they advocate can be demonstrated by these outcomes:
1.  Upon case closure, 95% of the CASA recommendations are implemented by the court, indicating quality, fact-based recommendations.
2.  Six months following case closure, 95% of the children remain safe, indicating that the issues bringing them to the attention of juvenile court have been resolved.   
 
The Tennessee CASA board completed an ambitious Strategic Plan for the organization, with expansion into new counties as a major goal. Numerous training events were held, including the 5th Annual Tennessee CASA Conference. 
 
Goals: The Tennessee CASA Board of Directors identified 6 goals for Tennessee CASA through the strategic planning process. 
Goal 1: Cultivate a collaborative and cohesive network that mitigates distance and delivers effective training and retention at all levels
Goal 2: Diversification of revenue and resources to sustain and grow TN CASA
Goal 3: Expansion of new and existing CASA programs
Goal 4: Increase public awareness and build the brand of CASA to positively affect its mission in Tennessee
Goal 5: Create a comprehensive system for collecting, synthesizing, and distributing data
Goal 6: To support the mission of TN CASA through highly effective governance 
See full Strategic Plan for 2015-2018 under Management Section 
 
 
 
Needs The TN CASA Board of Directors approved a robust Strategic Plan for TN CASA. Implementing the goals and objectives of the strategic plan will require additional resources.  
  • Funding for Expansion Efforts:  Of the 95 counties in Tennessee, only 52 have a CASA program.  TN CASA has embarked on a major expansion effort with the strategic goal of expanding into counties without a CASA program. Funding for new program development is imperative to the launch and success of expansion efforts. Approximate cost per year: $80,000
  • Funding to implement a comprehensive Quality Assurance process:   Tennessee CASA was fortunate to add a Quality Assurance Coordinator to the staff in 2017.  National CASA is updating standards and will require that state organizations provide site visits and monitoring to the local program network.  Tennessee CASA endeavors to provide the guidance and support to the local program network to ensure compliance with all National CASA and state standards. Approximate cost:  $40,000 per year
  • Statewide Public Relations:   While Tennessee CASA implemented a statewide volunteer recruitment/public awareness campaign in 2017, it is important to continue to provide new and innovative messaging in a variety of formats, i.e., website, social media, advertising.  Approximate cost per year: $25,000
  • Training for CASA Network:  Tennessee CASA strives to provide the most up-to-date expertise to the network through training events for directors, staff and volunteers.  Training is essential to a strong network of sustainable nonprofit organizations that provide quality advocacy to abused children in juvenile court.  Approximate cost: $40,000 per year
Other ways to donate, support, or volunteer
Visit our website's donation page: http://www.tncasa.org/donations.html
 
Please go to www.BeForTheChild.org to learn more about CASA volunteer.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Mutual & Membership Benefit / Alliances & Advocacy
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Children's and Youth Services
Areas of Service
Areas Served
TN
TN - Bedford
TN - Coffee
TN - Cumberland
TN - Davidson
TN - Dickson
TN - Lincoln
TN - Marshall
TN - Maury
TN - Overton
TN - Putnam
TN - Robertson
TN - Rutherford
TN - Smith
TN - Sumner
TN - Williamson
TN - Wilson
Tennessee CASA currently serves local CASA programs covering 52 counties in Tennessee.  The counties listed above are in the middle Tennessee area.  The complete list of counties is: Anderson, Bedford, Bledsoe, Blount, Bradley, Campbell, Coffee, Crockett, Cumberland, Davidson, Decatur, Dickson, Dyer, Franklin, Greene, Grundy, Hamblen, Hamilton, Hawkins, Henderson, Jefferson, Knox, Lake, Lincoln, Loudon, Madison, Marion, Marshall,  Maury, McMinn, Meigs, Monroe, Morgan, Overton, Putnam, Rhea, Roane, Robertson, Rutherford, Sequatchie, Shelby, Smith, Sullivan, Sumner, Tipton, Unicoi, Washington, Williamson, Wilson
 
Board Chair Statement The Tennessee CASA Board of Directors has developed a robust vision for CASA in the state of Tennessee. With a brand new Strategic Plan in place, we are looking forward to the growth of the Tennessee CASA network in the next three years. We plan to provide additional support to existing programs to encourage their growth in the number of children they serve. We also plan to give assistance to counties that want to develop a CASA program in their community.  With 29 programs, serving 52 counties, and 8 additional counties expressing interest in CASA, our next year's work is overflowing. It is through strong relationships with each other that we can better serve children. It is our hope that you will join us in our mission and share our vision that every abused and neglected child in the State of Tennessee is given the opportunity to thrive in a safe and loving home.  
Programs
Description Tennessee CASA is the primary agent for new program development.  The organization assists grass roots efforts in counties without a CASA program.  TN CASA visits with the judge hearing juvenile cases and other stakeholders to determine the level of commitment.  New programs must gain membership in National CASA to begin providing services. They must also be a member of TN CASA.  It takes approximately 9-12 months for a program to develop to the point they have a group of volunteers ready to serve children.  TN CASA helps each new program through extensive consultation and technical assistance.
Category
Population Served , ,
Long term Success The vision of TN CASA is one where every abused and neglected child in the State of Tennessee is given the opportunity to thrive in a safe and loving home. Our Mission is to support, develop, expand and unite local CASA programs in recruiting and training volunteers to advocate for Tennessee's abused and neglected children.  The organization has made steady progress and now has programs in 52 counties. Our growth is imperative to fulfilling our vision. We strive for the day when all 95 counties in Tennessee have a CASA program. 
Program Success Monitored By The Executive Director, staff and board all monitor program progress along with certain stakeholders such as the Tennessee Commission on Children and Youth.
Description
Tennessee CASA provides a broad array of comprehensive training to the local program network to enhance and empower the advocacy provided to abused children in juvenile court.  These trainings include, but not limited to:
A full-day state conference for CASA staff and volunteers as well as all involved in child welfare in Tennessee
Training of the Facilitator for the National CASA Pre-Service Volunteer Training Curriculum
Training for New Local CASA Program Directors
Board Development and Training for the Tennessee CASA Board
Leadership Training for Directors and Staff of the local CASA program network 
Category
Population Served , ,
Board Chair
Board Chair Maggie Bahou
Company Affiliation Hospice Compassus
Term Aug 2017 to Aug 2018
Email Maggie.Bahou@compassus.com
Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Katrina Arbogast Esq.AttorneyVoting
Maggie Bahou Human ResourcesVoting
Lyndsay Botts TN Dept. of TransportationVoting
Wib Evans FB VenturesVoting
Alisa Hobbs Agency RepresentativeVoting
Sonya Manfred Voting
Marianne Schroer Agency RepresentativeVoting
Annie Searock Agency RepresentativeVoting
Karen Taylor J.D.General MotorsVoting
Joe Walker First Tennessee BankVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 2
Female 8
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 84%
Does the organization have written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Does the organization have a written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage of Board Members making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of Board Members making In-Kind Contributions 75%
Does the Board include Client Representation? Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 4
Risk Management Provisions
Commercial General Liability
Directors and Officers Policy
Special Event Liability
Employee Dishonesty
Accident and Injury Coverage
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Ms. Lynne Farrar
Term Start Apr 2014
Email lynne@tncasa.org
Experience

LYNNE S. FARRAR

EMPLOYMENT HISTORY      

April 2014 – Present

Tennessee CASA Association Executive Director

July 1, 2010 to April, 2014      

CASA Works, Inc.  Bedford, Coffee and Franklin Counties Tennessee

·        Executive Director

·        Created a Governing Board, developed Charter, By-Laws, obtained 501(c) (3) tax-exempt status, and became a full member of the National CASA Association to create new CASA program to be independent of the umbrella organization.

·        CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) program that recruits, trains and supervises volunteers to advocate for abused children in Juvenile Court in Bedford, Coffee and Franklin Counties

·        Implement program, hire staff, develop job descriptions, set up policies, procedures, direct financial and program compliance; set objectives and evaluation methods for measurement

October 1, 1997 to June 30, 2010    

The Center for Family Development, Shelbyville, Tennessee

·        Associate Director -- Developed $1 million non-profit organization that provides prevention services to children and families in five counties

·        Director of CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocate) program that recruits, trains and supervises volunteers to advocate for abused children in Juvenile Court in Bedford and Coffee Counties

EDUCATION 

Middle Tennessee State University, Murfreesboro, Tennessee

·        B.S. 1978 Magna Cum Laude        Psychology and Business

1980 - 1982   Cannon Trust School, Charlotte, North Carolina

Staff
Full Time Staff 5
Part Time Staff 0
Volunteers 10
Contractors 0
Retention Rate 100%
Plans & Policies
Does the organization have a documented Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Does the organization have an approved Strategic Plan? Yes
Number of years Strategic Plan Considers 3
When was Strategic Plan adopted? Aug 2015
In case of a change in leadership, is a Management Succession plan in place? Yes
Does the organization have a Policies and Procedures Plan? Yes
Does the organization have a Nondiscrimination Policy? Yes
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
National CASA1991
Center for Nonprofit Management CEO Network2017
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Certificate of Compliance with National Standards for State OrganizationsNational CASA2012
 
 
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2017
Fiscal Year End June 30 2018
Projected Revenue $454,721.00
Projected Expenses $454,721.00
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201720162015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$15,000$25,000$30,000
Government Contributions$243,021$195,456$97,703
Federal$0$0$0
State$0$0$0
Local$0$0$0
Unspecified$243,021$195,456$97,703
Individual Contributions$52,588$4,035$86,070
$0$0$0
$0$0$0
Investment Income, Net of Losses$21$40$45
Membership Dues$9,993$9,442$0
Special Events$0$0$0
Revenue In-Kind$0$0$0
Other$0$0$25,600
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201720162015
Program Expense$332,804$238,477$217,310
Administration Expense$7,567$7,371$9,818
Fundraising Expense$0$0$0
Payments to Affiliates--$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.940.911.08
Program Expense/Total Expenses98%97%96%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201720162015
Total Assets$96,744$101,361$116,058
Current Assets$95,944$100,561$115,258
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$15,325$194$3,016
Total Net Assets$81,419$101,167$113,042
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201720162015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities6.26518.3638.22
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201720162015
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201720162015
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovernment Grants $243,021Government Grants $195,456Government Grants $97,703
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions, Gifts and Grants $52,588Foundations and Corporations $195,456Contributions, Gifts, and Grants $86,070
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountFoundations and Corporations $15,000Membership Dues $9,442Foundations and Corporations $30,000
IRS Letter of Exemption
Capital Campaign
Is the organization currently conducting a Capital Campaign for an endowment or the purchase of a major asset? No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit
TN Charitable Solicitations Registration Yes - Expires Dec 2018
GivingMatters.com Financial Comments
Financial figures taken from 990 only. 
990 was prepared by John R. Poole, CPA.
Comments provided by Kathryn Bennett 11/21/17.
Nonprofit Tennessee CASA Association Inc
Address 412 Golden Bear Court
Suite B202
Murfreesboro, TN 37128
Primary Phone (615) 220-3990
Contact Email lynne@tncasa.org
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Lynne Farrar
Board Chair Maggie Bahou
Board Chair Company Affiliation Hospice Compassus
Year of Incorporation 1991

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