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Blue Monarch

Last Updated: 4/23/2014 4:32:34 PM

Nonprofit

Blue Monarch

Address

P.O. Box 1207


Monteagle, TN 37356-
Grundy County

Primary Phone

(931) 924-8900

Primary Fax

(931) 467-3515

Contact Email

info@bluemonarch.org

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CEO/Executive Director

Ms. Susan Freeman Binkley

Board Chair

Mr. Henry Crais

Board Chair Company Affiliation

Accountant for Health Care Industry in GA, TN and AL

Board Members

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Year of Incorporation

2003

Former Names

Breaking the Cycle. Rebuilding the Family
Breaking the Cycle. Rebuilding the Family
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Overview

Blue Monarch, a long-term residential program for determined women and their children, provides a safe, nurturing and challenging environment, where they can overcome abuse, unhealthy choices and emotional wounds, while they restore family bonds and gain independence and maturity through the experience of God's love.
 
Blue Monarch is a non-profit designed to serve the abused and addicted women along with their children. We accept women who are currently recovering from physical, emotional and/or sexual abuse, alcohol or drug addictions, poverty and mental health issues.
 
Blue Monarch offers each woman a one to two-year residential program specifically designed to fit her individual needs and help her further her education, break her addictions, become a better mother, obtain a job and gain independence.

 


More Background

Programs

Recovery Program

View Program Details

Financials

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.

Projected Revenue

$330,900

Projected Expenses

$330,900

View Financial Details


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Gangs

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