Nashville Drug Court Support Foundation
1300 Division Street
Suite 107
Nashville TN 37203
Residents at Brick Church
Mission Statement
In 1996 the Nashville Drug Court Support Foundation (NDCSF) was incorporated to help the substance abuse problem in our local criminal justice system. The mission of the NDCSF is to solicit support for the Davidson County Drug Court Residential Program (DCDCRP). The NDCSF also works with agencies and stakeholders at the federal, state and local levels to help increase the public awareness of the link between crime, substance abuse and related issues, and bridge the gap between the criminal justice system and the community
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director
Board Chair Dr. Roland Gray MD
Board Chair Company Affiliation Tennessee Medical Foundation
History & Background
Year of Incorporation 1996
Organization's type of tax exempt status 501-C3
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Expenses $462,794.00
Projected Annual Revenue $462,794.00 (2014)
Statements
Mission In 1996 the Nashville Drug Court Support Foundation (NDCSF) was incorporated to help the substance abuse problem in our local criminal justice system. The mission of the NDCSF is to solicit support for the Davidson County Drug Court Residential Program (DCDCRP). The NDCSF also works with agencies and stakeholders at the federal, state and local levels to help increase the public awareness of the link between crime, substance abuse and related issues, and bridge the gap between the criminal justice system and the community
Background There are six Criminal Courts in Nashville, Davidson County, Tennessee. Each of these Courts handles approximately 2000 cases per year. Approximately 80% of these cases will involve either drugs or alcohol. In addition, research indicates that at least 60% of the people charged in those cases have a chemical dependency problem. Before 1995, the Corrections Corporation of America (CCA) facility in Nashville was the only penal institution in the State of Tennessee that offered any type of long-term treatment for addiction. It was apparent to the Judges of the Criminal Courts that the recidivism rate for persons appearing before them with a chemical dependency problem was extremely high. In 1995, the Judges became aware of a program called “drug court” that was attempting to combat the lack of treatment for chemically dependent offenders. The program was offered in the form of Federal grants through the United States Department of Justice. Judge Seth Norman, Judge of the Division IV Criminal Court, and Donna Blackbourne, the Davidson County Criminal Court Coordinator, began work on an application for a study grant to determine the value of such a program for Davidson County. The application was submitted, and a study grant was approved by the Department of Justice. What started as an outpatient drug treatment program has now evolved into a multi-faceted program including residential, IOP, after-care services and an outpatient program. The inpatient program can house 40 female and 60 male long-term residents for treatment of chemical dependency.
Impact Since the program was established and began taking it's first program intakes in 1996, over 700 offenders have successfully completed the program. The recidivism rate for persons successfully completing the program is approximately 30%. The retention rate since program inception is approximately 59%. On average, participants had more than 8 previous drug charges, and had been previously incarcerated from three to five years. By using this approach since June of 1996, the Davidson County Drug Court program has accomplished the following: diverted approximately 1,750 people from the current criminal justice process, provided the community with thousands of community service hours annually, maintained a 100% employment rate for graduates, and 7 drug-free babies have been born. All of this has been accomplished at an average cost of $48.00 per day per resident as opposed to $67.00 per day to house an inmate in the Tennessee prison system, representing a significant cost savings for tax-payers.  This savings is solely in "incarceration costs.  A more accurate "return on investment" includes benefits associated with the successful transitioning of more self-reliant, sober, and productive citizens who can positively contribute to society instead of being burdensome depends of the state.  From an economic standpoint, this is a "solution" to helping reduce costs associated with crime and addictive disorders.   
Needs We are working to diversify our funding sources. Individual support is strongly encouraged. We always welcome in kind donations-specifically gardening materials, paints & painting materials & equipment, gifts cards from Lowe's, Home Depot, & building materials for vocational development for our participants. We are also looking for committed volunteers and/or interns to support remedial education needs such as basic reading & writing tutoring. We are accepting interns from area colleges and universities in the social science and research fields and, to help us in developing a multi-year strategic plan, we are also interested in assistance from area business schools.  
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Crime & Legal - Related / Prison Alternatives
Secondary Organization Category Public & Societal Benefit /
Areas of Service
Areas Served
TN - Davidson
Although focused on the Nashville area, the work of the NDCSF has expanded statewide and impacts all Tennessee counties and congressional districts.  The DC4 Program serves non-violent offenders from 30 counties across the state with the majority coming from Davidson County. 
Programs
Description DC4 currently employs five full-time licensed alcohol and drug treatment counselors to provide addiction treatment to residents.  Roland Gray, MD, is the program's volunteer Medical Director and a Psychiatric Nurse Practitioner works with the DC4 Nurse to oversee medication needs for program participants and . The DC4 Treatment Director, Weldon Benthall oversees oversees the counseling staff and residential program monitors  who assist with recovery support services. Counselors serve program residents in Phase I, II, and III residents and there is one aftercare counselor. Trauma-specific education is provided to participants to address some of the underlying issues related to participants current substance abuse and mental health issues.  Treatment services are generally delivered in the following phases:
Category
Population Served , ,
Description This phase is a minimum of 4 weeks in length. During this phase, the residents complete orientation and any other assessments needed to develop the treatment plan. Residents stay at the residential facility 24 hours, 7 days a week during this phase. Residents are drug tested on a random basis.
Category Mental Health, Substance Abuse Residential Substance Abuse Treatment
Population Served Substance Abusers (Drug/Alcohol Abusers), ,
Description This phase is a minimum of 12 weeks in length. During this phase, residents work treatment plans bundled with a wide range of services including individual, group, family, and drama therapy. Services are delivered through didactic approaches such as psycho-therapy, addictions treatment, medication group, relapse prevention, group therapy and coping strategies. Cognitive therapy and motivational interviewing are integrated with a 12-step based recovery program. Our therapeutic community incorporates vocational training, educational/GED training, life skills, cognitive behavioral interventions and community service work. Each resident performs a minimum of 200 hours of community service work while in the residential program. During this phase, residents are slowly integrated into the community by attending five outside support meetings of AA/NA/CA. Residents receive no less than 2 random drug screens per month during this phase.
Category Mental Health, Substance Abuse Residential Substance Abuse Treatment
Population Served Substance Abusers (Drug/Alcohol Abusers), ,
Description This phase is a minimum of 12 weeks in length. During this phase, residents develop an initial aftercare plan with the counselor, begin employment or vocational training and maintain pursuits. Pass time is earned to begin the integration process back into the community. A program fee is charged to residents to include them in the financial responsibility to offset the cost of the program. Drug screens during this phase are very important for accountability. Residents receive no less than 2 random drug screens per month during this phase.
Category Mental Health, Substance Abuse Mental Health Treatment
Population Served Substance Abusers (Drug/Alcohol Abusers), ,
Description This phase is a minimum of 6 months. Upon successful completion of the three-phase program residents are graduated to aftercare. Graduates are placed in transitional housing away from the facility and return to DC4 weekly for group therapy individual therapy and drug testing.
Category Mental Health, Substance Abuse Substance Abuse
Population Served Substance Abusers (Drug/Alcohol Abusers), ,
Description
In 2004, the NDCSF began working with the Governor's Task Force on Methamphetamine and DC4 to implement a long-term residential program for methamphetamine addicted offenders from across Tennessee.  In 2005, DC4's overall program expanded to include up to 30 beds for methamphetamine addicted offenders from across the state. This program is still operating today as a part of the overall structure of DC4.  For more information about this program, please contact DC4 at 615-862-4220 and ask to speak with Alarick Pruitt - Case Developer or email alarickpruitt@jis.nashville.org
Category
Population Served , ,
Description
In 2008, the NDCSF began collaborating with DC4 and the Davidson County Mental Health Court and Mental Health Court Foundation to better address the needs of offenders with co-occurring substance abuse and mental health disorders.  The collaborative initiative between DC4 and the Mental Health Court resulted in an expansion of DC4 to include up to 10 beds for participants in the Mental Health Court and is still operating today.  This program typically lasts a minimum of 120 days and is an abbreviated version of the DC4 "Residential Program".  The length of stay may be extended based on the participant's needs.  The DC4 staff and the Mental Health Court staff work together with coordination and support assistance from the NDCSF staff to ensure that an comprehensive aftercare plan is in place to help these participants transition successfully back into society.  For more information about this program please contact ToniaDixon@jis.nashville.org or call 615-862-8320.
 
Category
Population Served , ,
Description

The Morgan County Residential Recovery Court (MCRRC) serves non-violent felony male drug offenders from "referring drug courts" across the state with well established "outpatient/aftercare programming", however are lacking in residential treatment programming.   Modeled similar to the DC4 Residential Program, the Recovery Court model provides for continuous judicial supervision by the MCRRC Presiding Judge while in the residential program. Each resident must stand before the Presiding Judge, at least twice per month, and be praised for progress or admonished for lack of effort or non-compliance. Judicial sanctions are also issued which can range from a period of time in the jail general population to additional community service work to restrictions or revocation of privileges. Establishing and maintaining abstinence is
the single most important factor in successful program participation. To ensure compliance with the requirement for abstinence, both scheduled and random drug screens are administered throughout each resident’s participation in the program. The treatment team will determine the length of time a participant must remain abstinent prior to completion of the program.

 

 

Category
Population Served , ,
Description

Phase One: Assessment and Orientation.

- Minimum of 6 weeks.

- Must stay with Big Brother throughout the day.

- Undergo assessments, which may include, but not limited to: education, mental health, employment, chemical dependency, and/or medical.

- Participate in all groups, lectures, individual sessions, and community activities.

- Participate in community service.

- No social pass or meeting pass privileges.

- Restricted use of telephone only as permitted by the Counselor.

- Complete autobiography.

- Complete assigned work on Steps 1 through 3.

- Demonstrate knowledge and acceptance of the MCRRC rules and policies.

- Attend Court with Presiding Judge twice per month.

- Demonstrate positive progress in recovery.

 

 

 

Category
Population Served , ,
Description

Phase Two: Stabilization and Rehabilitation.


Telephone, visitation and pass privileges according to the policies.

- Establish a relationship with a sponsor.

- Complete assigned work on Steps 4 through 8 and make a meaningful start on Step 9.

- Participate in all groups, lectures, individual sessions, and community activities.

- Participate in community service.

- Successfully serve in trusted leadership positions.

- Attend Court with Presiding Judge twice per month.

- Demonstrate positive sobriety.

 

Category
Population Served , ,
Description

Phase Two-B: Transition Planning and Preparation for Re-entry.

- Minimum of 6 weeks prior to graduation.

- Successful work on relapse prevention.

- In conjunction with the referring drug court, develop a written plan for transitioning to the referring drug court.

- Continue to participate in all groups, lectures, individual sessions, and community activities.

- Continue to participate in community service.

- During Phase Two-B, privileges may be modified or restricted in order to encourage a focus on preparing for transition to the referring drug court and outpatient living.

- Attend Court with Presiding Judge twice per month.

- Become clinically ready for transition back to referring drug court.

- Continuing progress in recovery.
To refer an offender to the Morgan County Residential Recovery Court Program, please contact Dana Russell at 615-862-5945 or email: danarussell@jis.nashville.org
 
Category
Population Served , ,
Description When a resident is admitted to MCRRC, he is assigned to another resident, a “big brother,” whose responsibility is to assist and
guide the new resident. Each new resident will begin in Phase One, an orientation period, for a minimum of six weeks and until the treatment staff determines that he is ready to be promoted to Phase Two. Graduation to either Phase Two or Phase Two-B, and subsequent graduation from the MCRRC program, will be based upon the evaluation of the treatment team and approval of the Presiding Judge. Demotion to a lower Phase is a possible sanction for violation of the Rules. A resident must satisfactorily complete all Phase requirements to be considered for graduation.
Category
Population Served , ,
Board Chair
Board Chair Dr. Roland Gray MD
Company Affiliation Tennessee Medical Foundation
Term May 2014 to May 2015
Email rolandg@e-tmf.org
Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Ms. Carol Etherington Vanderbilt UniversityVoting
Dr. Roland Gray M.D.Medical Director Tennessee Medical FoundationVoting
Dr. Robert Miller M.D.PhysicianVoting
Ms. Audrey Pessoni Retired Social WorkerVoting
Mr. Jim Rackard Retired BankerVoting
Mr. Manuel Ben Russ AttorneyVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 7
Female 2
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 70%
Does the organization have written Board Selection Criteria? Under Development
Does the organization have a written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage of Board Members making Monetary Contributions 70%
Percentage of Board Members making In-Kind Contributions 50%
Does the Board include Client Representation? No
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 2
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Ms. Jeri Holladay-Thomas
Term Start June 2004
Email jeri_ndcsf@comcast.net
Staff
Full Time Staff 3
Part Time Staff 1
Volunteers 50
Contractors 15
Retention Rate 100%
Plans & Policies
Does the organization have a documented Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Does the organization have an approved Strategic Plan? Under Development
In case of a change in leadership, is a Management Succession plan in place? Under Development
Does the organization have a Policies and Procedures Plan? Under Development
Does the organization have a Nondiscrimination Policy? Yes
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Center for Nonprofit Management Excellence Network2012
Home Builders Association of Middle Tennessee2004
PENCIL2004
Senior Staff
Title
Experience/Biography
Title
Experience/Biography
 
 
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2014
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2014
Projected Revenue $462,794.00
Projected Expenses $462,794.00
Endowment Spending Policy N/A
Endowment Spending Percentage (if selected) 0%
Detailed Financials
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201220112010
Program Expense$74,844$189,181$246,842
Administration Expense$214,703$57,583$55,368
Fundraising Expense$9,118$15,075$18,074
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.390.971.02
Program Expense/Total Expenses25%72%77%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue2%6%6%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201220112010
Total Assets$320,727$207,902$219,642
Current Assets$174,706$57,325$64,508
Long-Term Liabilities$49,134$53,025$56,652
Current Liabilities$0$0$0
Total Net Assets$271,593$154,877$162,990
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201220112010
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets15%26%26%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201220112010
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGrants and Contracts $372,741Government Grants $135,586Government Grants $212,734
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountIndividual Contributions $30,958Individual Contributions $118,129Individual Contributions $109,832
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountSpecial Events (Net) $11,450Investment Income $11Special Events/Fundraising $2,915
Capital Campaign
Is the organization currently conducting a Capital Campaign for an endowment or the purchase of a major asset? No
Capital Campaign Goal $0.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit
TN Charitable Solicitations Registration Yes - Expires June 2015
Organization Comments
2012 has been an exciting year! Over the past twelve months, as  Executive Director, I have been participating in a year-long educational program called "Collaboration College" along with two other non-profits (Mental Health America of Middle Tennessee and Tennessee Licensed Professional Counselors Association).  Through this experience, I've been able to gain a lot of new insight about collaborating, and the opportunities/risks associated with working with other similar organizations.   We have also been focusing on strategic planning and merging with another similar non-profit.  Since 2008, our organization has been working closely with another local non-profit (Davidson County Mental Health Court Foundation) to help enhance the services for not only addicted offenders, but also those suffering from co-occurring mental health disorders.  The partnership has yielded promising outcomes to date.  We believe that merging the two court foundations would help strengthen the partnership even more.  Over the past year, we have been working together with both non-profit boards and Judges Seth Norman (DC4) and Judge Dan Eisenstein (MHC) and are progressing forward with facilitation of this merger as a part of overall strategic planning.  Our target date to complete this merger is by the end of 2012. 
GivingMatters.com Financial Comments
2012 financial figures taken from audited financial statements. Previous figures taken from the 990. 2010 990 was amended. Updated form and figures have been entered. This organization did not have an audit conducted for FY10 or FY 11. 990 was prepared Farmer & Associates, PLLC. 4/19/13 BG
Nonprofit Nashville Drug Court Support Foundation
Address 1300 Division Street
Suite 107
Nashville, TN 37203
Primary Phone (615) 313-8480
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Jeri Holladay-Thomas
Board Chair Dr. Roland Gray MD
Board Chair Company Affiliation Tennessee Medical Foundation
Year of Incorporation 1996

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