Tennessee Holocaust Commission, Inc.
Vanderbilt University
2301 Vanderbilt Place PMB 406311
Nashville TN 37240
Survivors lighting commemorative candles to remember the lives lost at the Tennessee Day of Remembrance 2010.
Mission Statement
The Tennessee Holocaust Commission's mission is to provide education and promote remembrance of the Holocaust to the state of Tennessee. THC provides teachers, students and individuals with seminars, resources, workshops, traveling exhibits and commemorations to create awareness of the Holocaust; to fight prejudice and to encourage tolerance and understanding among all people. 

 
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Danielle Kahane-Kaminsky
Board Chair Mr. Larry Leibowitz
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
History & Background
Year of Incorporation 1996
Organization's type of tax exempt status 501-C3
Financial Summary
Graph: Expense Breakdown Graph - All Years
 
 
Projected Expenses $356,697.00
Projected Annual Revenue $356,697.00 (2017)
Statements
Mission
The Tennessee Holocaust Commission's mission is to provide education and promote remembrance of the Holocaust to the state of Tennessee. THC provides teachers, students and individuals with seminars, resources, workshops, traveling exhibits and commemorations to create awareness of the Holocaust; to fight prejudice and to encourage tolerance and understanding among all people. 

 
Background The Tennessee Holocaust Commission was created in 1984 by an act of the State Legislature. As its first formal act, The Commission created a memorial to the victims of the Holocaust. It stands on the grounds of the State Capitol. Ever since, the Commission has sponsored annual Days of Remembrance in locations statewide including an observance on the Capitol grounds.

New legislation in May 1996 recreated the Commission as the Tennessee Commission on Holocaust Education. The name change recognized the primary role of the Commission as education--at all levels and for all citizens. In conjunction with this change, a parallel body was created, Tennessee Holocaust Commission, Inc., (THC), a not-for-profit corporation dedicated to furthering the cause of Holocaust education and remembrance. The two entities share a Board of Directors.

Impact
Accomplishments:
1)  We expanded our Holocaust Education Conferences for teachers and students from 1 Middle Tennessee Conference to 4 conferences this year one in Nashville, Memphis, Chattanooga, and Knoxville to include all the grand divisions of the state.
2)  We digitized our entire collection of survivor and U.S. military recorded histories.
3)  We expanded our diversity training outreach to include the Metro Nashville Police Recruit Academy and several school districts. 
3)  We held our 32nd Annual State Day of Remembrance in March at the State Capitol.
Current Year Goals:
1)Provide training and support to children and grandchildren of Holocaust Survivors so that they may serve as surrogates for their family histories. 
2) Complete curriculum website to accompany Tennessee State Archives and individual survivor/liberator testimony.
3)To develop new opportunities within the greater community to benefit from the success of our prior year's diversity training. 
Needs
1)Identify funding sources to provide training and support to children and grandchildren of Holocaust survivors so that they may serve as surrogates for their family histories.$11,600
2) Continue and complete the development of curriculum to accompany the interview segments $7,500
3)  Identify funding sponsorship to support educational conferences throughout the state of Tennessee $10,000
4)  Identify funding sponsorship to support Teacher Seminar at United States Holocaust Memorial Museum $12,000
5) Additional staff to meet our expanding requests for our services $30,000
 
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Cultural & Ethnic Awareness
Secondary Organization Category Education /
Areas of Service
Areas Served
TN
The State of Tennessee
Board Chair Statement

“Tennesseans who are Holocaust survivors, refugees, and U.S. military liberators are growing older and fewer are able to share their stories in person. Time is our enemy. Our work at the Commission has an air of immediacy. The dilemma we hear from educators and students across the state is that they are most impacted by eyewitness accounts of survivors, refugees, and liberators. Updating raw film footage of eyewitness testimony to digital format will ensure the preservation of these historical resources to keep history alive for the next generation. It is critical that educators receive the training and resources necessary to provide the most accurate and appropriate information to students and the community regarding this crisis in history. While history cannot be unlived, it can serve as the foundation for changing the future.”– Felicia Anchor, Immediate Past Commission Chair, Tennessee Holocaust Commission

CEO Statement

The Tennessee Holocaust Commission is one of the oldest and most recognized commissions in the United States.  In 1996, new legislation recreated the Commission to recognize its primary role as education and to create a parallel not-for-profit body. For 32 years, the Tennessee Holocaust Commission has been promoting remembrance of the Holocaust to the state of Tennessee by providing teachers, students and individuals with seminars, resources, workshops, traveling exhibits and commemorations. Through conscientious oversight and guidance from Commissioners throughout the state, we continue to fulfill our mission of creating awareness of the Holocaust to fight prejudice and to encourage tolerance and understanding among all people.

Programs
Description
Day-long conferences introducing teachers and students to in-depth study and research focused topics on the Holocaust. Each conference includes a "talk-back" session with local survivors, refugees, and liberators who were eyewitnesses to this crisis in history.  Recent topics have included:
Voices From the Holocaust:  Moving from Reflection to Action-The Decision is Yours- A study of diary entries recovered from children and adolescents who witnessed the Holocaust.
The Power of Responsibility in the Holocaust and the Age of Genocide-This conference focused on the Teaching History Matters Project which has reunited over 200 survivors and liberators of a death train liberated on April 13, 1945 in Farsleben, Germany.
 We Were There/We Are Here-An in depth look at the villagers of Le Chambon who sheltered 5,000 Jews in Nazi-occupied France.
Budget 3000
Category Education, General/Other Teacher & Faculty
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years), Adults,
Short Term Success
60% of the teachers and students attending our conference will develop a school project for the year with a focus on genocide awareness and prevention.
Long term Success
80% of educators attending our conferences will utilize the materials they receive as primary source materials for their instruction in the classroom.
Program Success Monitored By
Student/Teacher Evaluation and Survey Forms
Examples of Program Success
Reflections from this year's conferences:
AlexaAlana- 8thGrade Student- Sevierville Middle School-“I do not believe mere acknowledgement is enough. We need to create awareness in our society sharing the sorrow these people suffered. We cannot let this happen once more. We need to understand the cruelty that existed. Our future is important and a Holocaust should not be part of it. We must enlighten our peers and stress the importance of the impact this had on society. Thank you so much for inviting us to this eye-opening experience! I loved learning more about the history of the Holocaust. The survivor’s speeches were truly amazing and touching. Thank you again for this once in a lifetime experience.” 

Teacher-Martin Luther King Jr. Magnet High School- “I really enjoyed today’s session and where the event was held. The survivors and their “living history” lessons are invaluable! I feel so lucky to have heard both of these gentlemen tell their stories today. Thank you for holding this annual event. My students look forward to attending every year.”

AllisonCheeseman-Student-Brentwood Academy-“Recognition of evil is a necessary first step. The future is not shaped passively, and society is not bettered by the gradual passing of time. Improvement and betterment of society can only be brought about with actions. Someone must step up and take the initiative and shoulder the burden of leading people away from the evil.”

Description Living On was first developed as a museum exhibition. Today it is both a traveling exhibition and an original documentary film. In the Living On exhibition you will see faces of Tennesseans who are both survivors of and witnesses to the Holocaust. The exhibition exists because each of these courageous individuals was willing to revisit painful memories, telling his or her story in hopes that history might never repeat itself.
Budget 5000
Category Education, General/Other Education, General/Other
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years), Adults,
Short Term Success
60% of teachers and students attending will develop a Holocaust or Genocide Awareness/Prevention project or club at their school.
Long term Success
80% of all people viewing the exhibit will be able to utilize the eyewitness testimony presented in research work or as a primary source for instruction regarding the Holocaust and World WarII.
Program Success Monitored By
Exit Interview
Survey
Evaluation
Project Submissions to the Commission
Examples of Program Success
Excerpt from a letter sent to the Commission on February 20, 2012 written by, Ryan Johnson a UT Knoxville student:
"After looking at and studying the Living On website I found myself amazed at the profound affect it had on me.  The first thing that my eyes were drawn to were the pictures of the survivors, the wrinkles, the strong and proud facial expressions, the different hair styles. The pictures portrayed to me, more than any movie or book has, that this is not a myth or some story trying to bring across the dangers of hatred and judgment, this was real and the men and women who endured this were real too."
Description

The Tennessee Holocaust Commission Holocaust Memories Film Archive Project is composed from 80 hours of film footage of 100 Tennesseans who are Holocaust survivors, refugees, and U.S. military liberators. Our project consists of updating and editing this footage from its unused archive status to digital platforms and formats, where the footage could be easily accessed and utilized as an educational resource that preserves, sustains, and teaches this important legacy through educational DVDs and online access as well as accompanying curricular resources.

Budget 150000
Category Education, General/Other Educational Delivery
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years), Adults, K-12 (5-19 years)
Short Term Success
80% of all teachers who come into contact with the Commission through a conference, the speaker's bureau , or commemorative event will integrate these eyewitness testimonies into their instruction. 
Long term Success
70% of all history teachers in the State of Tennessee will include these interviews into their instruction when teaching about World War II.
Program Success Monitored By
Surveys
Evaluations
Project Submissions
Examples of Program Success
These films are in development so we have no evidence at this time.
Description

The Tennessee Holocaust Commission offers a three day seminar at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum for secondary teachers. This intensive learning and interactive opportunity is designed for all subject areas grades 7-12. Funding for this opportunity comes from the Tennessee Holocaust Commission, grants, donations, and from each participant or their school system. 

Budget 3600
Category Education, General/Other Teacher & Faculty
Population Served Adolescents Only (13-19 years), ,
Short Term Success
100% of all teachers attending this seminar will integrate primary source materials that they obtained through these workshops into their instruction to better meet the National Core Curriculum Standards. 
Long term Success
100% of all educators attending this workshop will develop a lesson, project, or activity regarding Holocaust or genocide awareness/education to be shared with colleagues around the state.
Program Success Monitored By
Evaluation Forms
Project Submissions
Examples of Program Success
Receiving the opportunity to travel to Washington, D.C. with the Tennessee Holocaust Commission was changed mine and my students' lives, and the Teachers Seminar provided the background knowledge and experience of witnessing the actual artifacts on display at the museum to describe for my classes, and the added benefit of hearing the testimony of another survivor who spoke while we were at the museum, not to mention the opportunity to collaborate with other like minded educators. The great deal of additional knowledge I gained from the seminar now allows me to teach with a much more well rounded perspective, and the tools with which to share that perspective.Instead of simply teaching the Holocaust as enrichment to learning about Anne Frank, I can now teach the Holocaust and include the more famous text without limiting my students' exposure. Because now I realize the complexity of the event, I feel I can be a more accurate witness for the survivors whom I've met and the history I've been given the responsibility of sharing.~Mrs. Amy Fletcher, DeKalb County Schools
 
Attending the seminar in Washington, DC, with the Tennessee Holocaust Commission was a tremendous experience. I had the chance to view the United States Holocaust Memorial, meet employees of the museum and learn from them about their mission and collections. In our other meetings the group shared and developed lesson ideas and were able to learn from Dr. Paul Fleming and Tennessee Holocaust Commission executive director Danielle Kahane-Kaminsky about the mission of the THC, how to put it to use in our classrooms, schools and communities and how to be part of a larger community of teachers in Tennessee who are dedicated to expanding the knowledge of students about the Holocaust, why it is still an important part of history that needs to be continually studied and how to correctly and effectively do so. I have recommended this great experience to many of my peers.~Mr. Dave Barrett, Shelby County Schools
Board Chair
Board Chair Mr. Larry Leibowitz
Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Term Sept 2014 to Nov 2018
Email Lpleibowitz@gmail.com
Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Ms. Felicia Anchor Community VolunteerVoting
Mr. Jack Belz Belz EnterprisesVoting
Tristan Denley Board of RegentsVoting
Annette Eskind NashvilleVoting
Mr. L. Allen Exelbierd CPAVoting
Jan Belz Groveman MemphisVoting
Governor Bill Haslam Tennessee State GovernorExofficio
Katherine High University of TennesseeVoting
Aileen Katcher NashvilleVoting
Senator Brian Kelsey Voting
Gus Kuhn IIITreasurerVoting
Ms. Alison Leibovitz Voting
Lawrence Leibowitz KnoxvilleVoting
Josh Lipman Voting
Commissioner Candice McQueen TN Commissioner of EducationExofficio
Art Pais
Leonid Saharovici Holocaust SurvivorVoting
Rabbi Mark Shiftan Voting
Ronnie Steine
Representative Mark White Voting
E. Thomas Wood NashvilleVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 0
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 22
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 14
Female 7
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 0
Board Meeting Attendance % 90%
Does the organization have written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Does the organization have a written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage of Board Members making Monetary Contributions 80%
Percentage of Board Members making In-Kind Contributions 10%
Does the Board include Client Representation? No
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 2
Standing Committees
Education
Executive
Finance
Human Resources / Personnel
Strategic Planning
Risk Management Provisions
Directors & Officers Policy
General Property Coverage
Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Workers Compensation & Employers' Liability
Blanket Personal Property
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Ms. Danielle Kahane-Kaminsky
Term Start Apr 2010
Email danielle.kahane-kaminsky@vanderbilt.edu
Experience Danielle Kahane-Kaminsky has a strong background in curriculum development and teacher training  serving in the field of education for twenty-six years. Ms. Kahane-Kaminsky is a first generation American child of Belgian Holocaust refugees.  As the daughter of refugees, she has grown up hearing the stories of aunts, uncles, cousins, and grandparents.  Ms. Kahane-Kaminsky is passionate about the mission of the Tennessee Holocaust Commission and the importance of communicating the meaning of the Holocaust to succeeding generations so that genocide becomes a thing of the past and history does not repeat itself.
Staff
Full Time Staff 1
Part Time Staff 2
Volunteers 60
Contractors 0
Retention Rate 100%
Plans & Policies
Does the organization have a documented Fundraising Plan? Yes
Does the organization have an approved Strategic Plan? Yes
Number of years Strategic Plan Considers 5
When was Strategic Plan adopted? May 2009
In case of a change in leadership, is a Management Succession plan in place? No
Does the organization have a Policies and Procedures Plan? Yes
Does the organization have a Nondiscrimination Policy? Yes
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Center for Nonprofit Management Excellence Network1996
Senior Staff
Title CPARoslyn moved to Nashville in 1979 and returned to university in 1980 in order to complete a course that would lead to her achieving her CPA. She worked for a number of public accounting firms, bef
Experience/Biography Roslyn Landa moved to Nashville in 1979 and returned to university in 1980 in order to complete a course that would lead to her achieving her CPA.  She worked for a number of public accounting firms, before starting her own private practice and becoming involved with the non-profit sector. 
 
 
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $356,697.00
Projected Expenses $356,697.00
Endowment Spending Policy Income plus capital appreciation
Detailed Financials
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$117,529$111,512$144,464
Administration Expense$24,584$37,923$57,461
Fundraising Expense$3,925$8,846$3,270
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.241.391.11
Program Expense/Total Expenses75%70%70%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue2%4%1%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$680,649$642,612$588,265
Current Assets$403,194$385,667$357,823
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$1,853$1,474$7,738
Total Net Assets$678,796$641,138$580,527
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities217.59261.6546.24
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovernment Grants $135,000Government Grants $135,000Government Grants $172,500
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions, Gifts and Grants $55,087Contributions, Gifts & Grants $80,947Contributions, Gifts, and Grants $49,628
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountInvestment Income $4,032Investment Income $4,189Investment Income $4,792
Capital Campaign
Is the organization currently conducting a Capital Campaign for an endowment or the purchase of a major asset? No
Capital Campaign Goal $0.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit
TN Charitable Solicitations Registration Yes - Expires Dec 2017
Solicitations Permit
Charitable Solicitations 2017
GivingMatters.com Financial Comments
Financial figures taken from the 990.
Financial documents were prepared by Frasier, Dean & Howard, PLLC.
Comments provided by Kathryn Bennett 12/13/16.
 
*Organization’s endowment is housed at The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee.
Nonprofit Tennessee Holocaust Commission, Inc.
Address Vanderbilt University
2301 Vanderbilt Place PMB 406311
Nashville, TN 37240
Primary Phone (615) 343-2563
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Danielle Kahane-Kaminsky
Board Chair Mr. Larry Leibowitz
Board Chair Company Affiliation Community Volunteer
Year of Incorporation 1996

Related Information

Cultural and Ethnic Diversity

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