Domestic Violence Program, Inc.
2106 East Main Street
Murfreesboro TN 37130
Mission Statement
Providing emergency services to battered women, their minor children, victims of sexual abuse, victims of elder abuse and crime victims over age 60. Services include 24-hour crisis line, court advocacy and court accompaniment, safe shelter, counseling and community education. The agency was chartered to: help prevent occurrences of domestic violence and lessen the impact of abuse to family and household members; to educate the community regarding the causes and the number of incidences of domestic violence; to assist other service providers in coordination of programs for victims; to involve volunteers and raise the volunteer commitment in areas of domestic violence, and to hold batterers accountable by working with the criminal justice system.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Deborah Johnson
Board Chair Mr Bryan Nale
Board Chair Company Affiliation 1st Tennessee bank
History & Background
Year of Incorporation 1986
Organization's type of tax exempt status 501-C3
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Expenses $697,170.00
Projected Annual Revenue $697,170.00 (2015)
Statements
Mission Providing emergency services to battered women, their minor children, victims of sexual abuse, victims of elder abuse and crime victims over age 60. Services include 24-hour crisis line, court advocacy and court accompaniment, safe shelter, counseling and community education. The agency was chartered to: help prevent occurrences of domestic violence and lessen the impact of abuse to family and household members; to educate the community regarding the causes and the number of incidences of domestic violence; to assist other service providers in coordination of programs for victims; to involve volunteers and raise the volunteer commitment in areas of domestic violence, and to hold batterers accountable by working with the criminal justice system.
Background
The Domestic Violence Program, Inc. began in 1986 when two groups of women from the local Veteran's Hospital and from Middle Tennessee State University both viewed the movie "The Burning Bed" and each group began questioning the availability of resources for victims of domestic violence in our community. They approached the YWCA in Nashville who began this organization as an outreach program of their shelter. We became an independent 501(c)(3) non-profit agency in 1987. We began with a donated public office, a crisis line and three safe houses.The agency became a United Way member in 1988 which allowed us to open two small, safe-shelter houses.The program was given an opportunity in 1989 to assist all Petitioners fill out Orders of Protection petitions in our office and the local rules of court were changed to allow our advocates to be present for all hearings. Our court advocates now answer the docket call and our court has provided us with a dedicated Order of Protection docket each week. Frequently we are able to discuss the Order of Protection with the defendant and reach an agreement.When this is possible the victim does not have to testify in court.The program added elder abuse and sexual assault services when additional VOCA funding was made available and provides specialized children services under a VOCA grant. We employ a full time children's coordinator at the shelter. The agency originally employed one full time and one part time staff. Today we have 17 advocates and our Office Manager and our Executive Director. Agency staff include three master level social workers and a state licensed family counselor. Our elder abuse coordinator has been with the program 17 years. Five years ago the Board of Directors approached the City of Murfreesboro and requested land to build a shelter. The Cities gift was leveraged to make the award of a 1.4 million dollar Christy-Houston grant possible and several local donors such as the Women's Charity Circle made our new shelter a reality, opening in December 2003.Consisting of 16,000 square feet, the shelter has 12 motel-like bedrooms with baths and ample client and staff space, a laundry area, library and gated grounds. The shelter has an elevator, security system and is handicap accessible. The agency staff and board reflect the diversity of our community and run a culturally competent program that continues to impact victims in the 16th Judicial District.
Impact Domestic violence causes more injury to women than all rapes, muggings and auto accidents combined. One in four women will be a victim of domestic violence. Annually 8.8 million children witness this violence in their home. These children are 30% more likely to be arrested for a violence crime as an adult. In Rutherford County the Domestic Violence Program is the only agency that provides specific services to these victims. We served 1216 women, 199 men and 770 children in 2004-05. The agency provides immediate access to safety for victims through its 24-hour crisis line and safe shelter.Over 8000 crisis calls were taken Advocates are available weekdays to assist Petitioners file Orders of Protection in Rutherford and Cannon Counties.602 victims were assisted with court in 2004-05. Three significant goals for the current year are 1.The Domestic Violence Program has set a significant local donor and fundraising goal for the new year. We have been over 70% grant funded in past years. This year we will drop to 58% grant funding and raise our fundraising and local donations to 22% and our Foundation support to 13%. 2. We have set a goal to serve our more disenfranchised clients including victims who have drug and alcohol histories, are elderly, disabled and limited English speaking. These are difficult victims to serve in a shelter environment and through the courts and abusers have an easier time controlling them. 3. We plan to follow our clients for up to nine months following shelter or court advocacy and provide victims with a safety net. Victims are in the greatest danger after leaving batterers. Three most significant accomplishments for the past year. 1. In Dec 2003 our agency completed a capital campaign and opened a new residential shelter that serves 48 clients. 2. Our board re-vitalized itself taking a new active role in the agency and began working on a strategic plan for the agency. 3.We hired a Development Director as our second administrative staff.
Needs
The Domestic Violence Program Inc. is always in need of both office volunteers and direct client volunteers. We especially need volunters to train for our sexual assault crisis line and hospital accompaniment. Volunteers can accompany victims to court which is always rewarding. At the shelter we use all manner of toiletries and cleaning products, linens and kitchen ware. We especially need bath size towels and silverware at this time. Paper products especially paper towels, toilet tissue and baby wipes are always needed.
Other ways to donate, support, or volunteer Mailed checks and in-kind donations are always welcome.  We also have a donation tab on our web page and many volunteer opportunities. We are a member of Hands On Nashville or go to our website or call Kara at 896-7377 for complete volunteer information. We need sexual assault advocates and crisis line volunteers, court advocates, office workers and help at our safe shelter location. One day work group projects are always needed for yard work, shelter maintenance,  fundraisers and children's events. References and a  $10 background check are required of all applicants. Student interns are welcome. we work regularly with social work,  and psychology students, also pre-law and criminal justice majors. 
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Human Services / Family Violence Shelters and Services
Secondary Organization Category Crime & Legal - Related / Spouse Abuse Prevention
Tertiary Organization Category Mental Health & Crisis Intervention / Sexual Assault Services
Areas of Service
Areas Served
TN - Rutherford
Our primary service area is Rutherford County and our program has provided services over the years to rural Cannon County including a small outreach office in Woodbury Tennessee. Now Cannon County has a small program called SAVE with a volunteer staff. We continue to provide some court advocacy and try to support for their fundraisers.
CEO Statement It has been my pleasure to serve as the director of this agency since its inception in 1986. This tenure has allowed me to see the impact that supportive services make to victims of domestic violence and their families. Victims who have the support they need they will follow through with plans to make their family safe. A large majority of victims we serve who return to abusers do so for financial reasons or out of continued fear of what he will do. Our agency began with a walk-in public office which offered non-traditional victims of family violence access to services. We have served elder abuse victims, male victims,and other household members such as siblings and in-laws needing assistance through counseling or the court system. Only 20% of our clients need to enter the safe shelter. The shelter is critical for their safety but 80% of victims need counseling, emergency financial assistance and court advocacy. Our new shelter is handicap accessible and we are serving more disabled women in shelter. Our community's number of immigrants is growing and we are struggling to find bi-lingual staff and have our pertinent material translated. We have gotten our fledgling web site up and have linked to some impressive sites that have multi-language capability. The children in these families remain a major concern for us. They are so guilty for the abuse at home, having been told it is their fault. They are so angry at both parents for the abuse and frequently side with the abuser who seems all powerful. They then become the next generation of victims as well as abusers. Often these families have so much going on that health needs have taken a back seat. We work hard to reconnect families to resources such as the Health Department's well baby services and we have arranged to have the Doral Dental van come directly to the shelter each month. The library book mobile is another visitor each week at the shelter and support groups are held at shelter as well as in the community. We have begun to see more immigrant victims and Limited English speaking persons in our program.  
Programs
Description assistance filing Orders of Protection and accompaniment to hearings . Victims filing Orders of Protection in Rutherford County through our agency are provided with free attorney representation for any matters directly concerning thier Order of Protection case,
Category Crime & Legal, General/Other Family Violence Prevention
Population Served Victims, ,
Description emergency shelter for women and children who are Domestic Violence or sexual assault victims.  Our new shelter can sleep 48 individuals and there is no limit on the age of minor children. An average shelter stay is six weeks with possible extention. All clients receive full case management, meals, toiletries and some limited assistance with day care and transportation.A LEP spanish speaking staff person is available as requested. The shelter has security system, fencing and camera monitoring. Curfews are at 8 PM and 9 PM weekends.
Category
Population Served , ,
Description scheduled and walk-in crisis counseling and advocacy for sexual assault victims. The agency has a second 24-hour crisis line to address sexual assault issues.  Trained volunteers and staff also provide hospital accompaniment to rape victims at local area hospitals on a rotating 24 schedule.  The agency is part of our community SART (Sexual Assault Responce Team) consisting of law enforcement, DA's office, Hospital ER staff and counselors and advocates.
Category
Population Served , ,
Description Specialized services for victims of domestic violence or crime victims over 60 are provided as well as all core services including counseling, court advocacy and safe shelte.  Home visits are arranged as requested.  Some times the progam can replace broken window glass, change locks or replace the cost of stolen items like food stamps or prescription medications. Our elderly population of crime vicitms is increasing but still too few victims over age 60 are taking advantage of some of the services that could be provided.  Greater outreach is helping bring clients into this program.
Category
Population Served , ,
Description
Follow-up services and transitional housing provide additional assistance to families leaving the shelter facility. We can provide up to $100 to help reconnect utilities, provide food and cleaning supplies to a family returning to their home or make the home safer by changing door locks. The transitional housing is provided for three families at a time, in each of two houses, rent free, for up to six months for families working on job skills, budgeting classes or other programs to help them become successful independent households again.One additional house is available for permanent housing for one or two disabled victims. These houses are possible through HUD funding and other collaborations including the Baptist Healing Trust and the City of Murfreesboro Community Block Grant pass though grant.   
Category Housing, General/Other Transitional Housing
Population Served Families, Elderly and/or Disabled, Victims
CEO Comments All programs of the Domestic Violence Program are free of charge. Shelter, crisis-line and counseling are available at any time. Support groups are held Thursday evenings for moms and for children who have witnessed abuse in their homes. We are excited to have added a certified social work counselor to our staff this year. Shelley will be assisting Judy Nance provide free walk-in couseling in our main office for victims of rape, sexual assault or domestic violence. Please call for locations. Court advocacy is available Monday through Friday 8:30 to 4:00. We have now hired an attorney to work with vicitms going through court in our county for Orders of Protection. Representation by our attorney for this court process is free of charge as are all of our agency's programs. Our counties do not however have any night or week end court options. Several other services are available by referral such as safe exchange at the Exchange Club Family Center, afterschool care through the Boys and Girls Club and Batterers Intervention through the Restore Program. Limited transportation and emergency financial assistance may be offered to clients in shelter or persuing court orders.
Board Chair
Board Chair Mr Bryan Nale
Company Affiliation 1st Tennessee bank
Term July 2010 to July 2015
Email bryan.nale@1sttennessee.com
Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Ms Leslie Akins RealestateVoting
Ms. Rachel Holder Community AdvocateVoting
Ms Marla Hord Charity Circle
Ms Billi Jo Josovitz Exit RealityVoting
Dr Elizabeth La Roche PhysicanVoting
Ms Demitri Listovitch First Bank
Ms Mitzi Maybery Verizon
Ms. Brenda McKnight Murfreesboro Housing AuthorityVoting
MS Jo Jones Morris Charity Circle
Mr Bryan Nale US BankVoting
Mr Sarah OKeefe
Mr Scott Russel Voting
Mr Chanto Sourinho Murffreesboro SchoolsVoting
Ms Stephanie Treutlain Voting
Ms Peggy Young Purity DairyVoting
Mr Belford Zeigler Verizon Call CenterVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 1
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 4
Female 11
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Does the organization have written Board Selection Criteria? Under Development
Does the organization have a written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage of Board Members making Monetary Contributions 80%
Percentage of Board Members making In-Kind Contributions 90%
Does the Board include Client Representation? Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 6
Board CoChair
Board CoChair Mr Scott Russel
Company Affiliation Verizon
Term Mar 2012 to July 2015
Email Scott.russel@verizonwireless.com
Standing Committees
Advisory Board
Executive
Finance
Staff Development
Risk Management Provisions
Commercial General Liability & D and O & Umbrella or Excess & Automobile & Professional
Computer Equipment & Software
Directors & Officers Policy
Special Event Liability
Workers Compensation & Employers' Liability
CEO Comments The Domestic Violence Program is under the direction of a volunteer Board of Directors. The Board maintains a finance committee which oversees the agency's annual budget and a standing personnel committee which oversees the work of the Executive Director. The Director is responcible for hiring and supervision of the advocacy staff and Office Manager. Each year the agency has a CPA audit and most years is monitored by the State Department of Criminal Justice Programs.The agency and residential shelter fall under the Tennessee Life and Fire Safety Codes and Codes for shelters for the City of Murfreesboro Tennessee. The agency is also monitored annually by the Second Harvast Foods Organization and the shelter facility is inspected by a committee of our Board of directors twice a year.
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Ms. Deborah Johnson
Term Start July 1986
Email shelter2@bellsouth.net
Experience Deborah was hired in 1986 as the first director of the program under the supervision of the YWCA. She remained director as the program became independent. Deborah has a MA in Sociology and certification as a gerontologist. She minored in Criminal Justice. Deborah has served as the programs liason to the Tennessee Coalition, and currently chairs the United Way's Executive Directors Committee and co-chairs the Mayor's Homeless Taskforce. Deborah has frequently been an adjunct proffessor at Middle Tennessee State University since graduating in 1986
Staff
Full Time Staff 10
Part Time Staff 8
Volunteers 58
Contractors 2
Retention Rate 75%
Plans & Policies
Does the organization have a documented Fundraising Plan? Under Development
Does the organization have an approved Strategic Plan? Under Development
In case of a change in leadership, is a Management Succession plan in place? No
Does the organization have a Policies and Procedures Plan? Yes
Does the organization have a Nondiscrimination Policy? Yes
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Mary Stroble Vol Award FinalistCNM1990
Senior Staff
Title Court Coordinator
Experience/Biography Myra  was hired by the agency in 3/2011. She serves the program asCourt Coordinator.Myra has a case load of domestic violence and sexual assault victims seeking Orders of Protection within Rutherford County. She is our agency resources person when it comes to finding any information about the local civil court process or civil and criminal coutr interface for oue vicitms. 
Title sexual assault counselor
Experience/Biography Ms. Nance has been employerd with our agency nine years. She has a Masters degree if Family Counseling and provides both walk-in crisi counseling and is our current womens support group leader. She has maintained her proffessional education by participating in both in state and out of state conferences. She frequently provides court accompaniment to her clients. Judy is our agencies representative to the Tennessee Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence in Nashville.
Title Daily Operations Manager
Experience/Biography Bettie has been with our agrncy since August 2001. She moved quickly from her original positon as front desk intake staff to offcie mainager to her current position as Daily Operations Manager in the winter of 2007. Bettie is responcible for runnning our main office and for all personnel and financial record keeping. She has excellent computer skills and is the go to person for our data base software. She inputs all of our daily financial information into Quickbooks and manages all accounts payable and payroll.
CEO Comments The Domestic Violence Program is under the direction of a volunteer Board of Directors. The Board maintains a finance committee which oversees the agency's annual budget and a standing personnel committee which oversees the work of the Executive Director. The Director is responcible for hiring and supervision of the advocacy staff and Daily Operations Manager. Each year the agency has a CPA audit and most years is monitored by the State Department of Criminal Justice Programs.The agency and residential shelter fall under the Tennessee Life and Fire Safety Codes and Codes for shelters for the City of Murfreesboro Tennessee. The agency is also monitored annually by the Second Harvast Foods Organization and the shelter facility is inspected by a committee of our Board of directors twice a year.
 
 
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2014
Fiscal Year End June 30 2015
Projected Revenue $697,170.00
Projected Expenses $697,170.00
Endowment Spending Policy N/A
Endowment Spending Percentage (if selected) 0%
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201320122011
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$0$0$0
Government Contributions$439,089$416,056$475,280
Federal$0$0$0
State$0$0$36,324
Local$0$0$46,700
Unspecified$439,089$416,056$392,256
Individual Contributions$187,278$191,027$184,150
$72,050$72,632$68,960
$10,384$10,294$8,792
Investment Income, Net of Losses$2,824($2,736)$5,851
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$0$0$0
Revenue In-Kind$0$0$0
Other$8,536$9,201$4,527
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201320122011
Program Expense$672,590$681,897$701,633
Administration Expense$97,816$98,536$98,102
Fundraising Expense$0$0$0
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.930.890.93
Program Expense/Total Expenses87%87%88%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201320122011
Total Assets$1,692,845$1,745,471$1,823,751
Current Assets$123,753$127,644$161,502
Long-Term Liabilities$3,069$6,421$0
Current Liabilities$14,937$13,966$14,709
Total Net Assets$1,674,839$1,725,084$1,809,042
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities8.289.1410.98
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201320122011
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201320122011
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovernment Grants $439,089Government Grants and Contracts $416,056Government Grants $475,280
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions, Gifts, and Grants $187,278Other Contributions, Gifts, and Grants $191,027Donations $184,150
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountIndirect Public Support (United Way) $72,050Indirect Public Support (United Way) $72,632Indirect Public Support (United Way campaigns) $68,960
Capital Campaign
Is the organization currently conducting a Capital Campaign for an endowment or the purchase of a major asset? No
Capital Campaign Goal $0.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit
TN Charitable Solicitations Registration Yes - Expires Dec 2014
Solicitations Permit
2013 -2014 Solicitations Permit
Organization Comments
The increased revenue during 2010 was in part the gift of two residential homes given to the agency from the City of Murfresboro through Pres O'Bama's stimulus program and valued at approximately $130,000 each. These two foreclosed on properties now house two low income families at very nominal rent for an indefinite period. After inital expences  and annual taxes and insurance these homes will provide some additional revenue to the agency.
GivingMatters.com Financial Comments
Beginning in 2011, financial data taken from audited financial statements.
Financials completed by Edmondson, Betzler & Montgomery PLLC.
Comment provided by Laurel Fisher 1/28/14.
Nonprofit Domestic Violence Program, Inc.
Address 2106 East Main Street
Murfreesboro, TN 37130
Primary Phone (615) 896-7377
Contact Email shelter2@bellsouth.net
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Deborah Johnson
Board Chair Mr Bryan Nale
Board Chair Company Affiliation 1st Tennessee bank
Year of Incorporation 1986

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