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McMinnville Warren County Senior Center

Last Updated: 5/13/2013 12:43:02 PM

Nonprofit

McMinnville Warren County Senior Center

Address

809 Morrison Street


McMinnville, TN 37110-1100
Warren County

Primary Phone

(931) 4736559

Primary Fax

(931) 4732982

Contact Email

wacosrctr@blomand.net

CEO/Executive Director

Ms. Cheryl Watson-Mingle

Board Chair

Mr Vic Castellano

Board Chair Company Affiliation

Retired Designer Engineer / Disabled

Board Members

View

Year of Incorporation

1981

Former Names

Southside Senior Citizen Center (1996)


Overview

Our mission is to promote and maintain independence, wellness and advocacy for adults 50+, their families and caregivers. The Senior Center was established in 1975 and incorporated in 1981 to serve as a community focal point where older persons can come together for services and activities which enhance their dignity, support their independence, and encourage involvement in and with our local community.

More Background

Programs

Senior Center Services

Warren County CARES (Caring About Rural Elderly Society)

Sunny Day Adult Day Services

Relatives As Parents Program (RAPP)

Faith in Action CARES (Caring About Rural Elderly Society)

View Program Details

Financials

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.

Projected Revenue

$207,876

Projected Expenses

$205,924

View Financial Details


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