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Martha O'Bryan Center

Last Updated: 4/16/2014 5:13:58 PM

Nonprofit

Martha O'Bryan Center

Address

711 South 7th Street


Nashville, TN 37206-3895
Davidson County

Primary Phone

(615) 254-1791

Primary Fax

(615) 242-3411

Contact Email

tadams@marthaobryan.org

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Visit us on Facebook

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CEO/Executive Director

Ms. Marsha Edwards

Board Chair

Mr. Tim Sinks

Board Chair Company Affiliation

Capital Financial Group

Board Members

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Year of Incorporation

1951

Former Names

Children we serve.
Children we serve.

Overview

On a foundation of Christian faith, the Martha O’Bryan Center empowers children, youth, and adults in poverty to transform their lives through work, education, employment and fellowship.

More Background

Programs

Young Children and Families

Youth Services: K-8

High School & Post Secondary Services

Family and Community Services

View Program Details

Financials

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.

Projected Revenue

$6,247,421

Projected Expenses

$6,224,267

View Financial Details


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