Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence
2 International Plaza Drive
Suite 425
Nashville TN 37217-2019
Mission Statement

The mission of the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence is to end domestic and sexual violence in the lives of Tennesseans and to change societal attitudes and institutions that promote and condone violence through four primary work areas: public policy advocacy, education/training and technical assistance, public awareness and direct services for victims. 

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Kathy Walsh
Board Chair Ms Rebecca Wells Demaree
Board Chair Company Affiliation Cornelius & Collins Law Firm
History & Background
Year of Incorporation 1984
Former Names
Tennessee Task Force Against Domestic Violence
Tennessee Coalition Against Sexual Assault
Tennessee Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence
Organization's type of tax exempt status 501-C3
Financial Summary
Graph: Expense Breakdown Graph - All Years
 
 
Projected Expenses $2,251,797.00
Projected Annual Revenue $2,251,797.00 (2017)
Statements
Mission

The mission of the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence is to end domestic and sexual violence in the lives of Tennesseans and to change societal attitudes and institutions that promote and condone violence through four primary work areas: public policy advocacy, education/training and technical assistance, public awareness and direct services for victims. 

Background

The Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence began in 1983 when a small group of committed activists gathered together to work on legislation that would provide the first state funding for domestic violence programs in Tennessee. After this successful effort, the group decided to formalize its existence as the Tennessee Task Force on Family Violence. The Task Force merged in 2000 with the Tennessee Coalition Against Sexual Assault and eventually became the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence, Tennessee’s only statewide coalition dedicated to the eradication of violence against women.

Impact

Here’s what we’ve been able to accomplish this past year with your help and support:

$400,000 was invested by the Coalition in local community efforts to end domestic and sexual violence

4,744 victim advocates, police officers, judges, social workers, nurses, probation officers, clerks, and policymakers received training and technical assistance from the Coalition.

180 immigrant and trafficked victims received direct legal advice and representation from the Coalition’s Immigrant Legal Clinic.

174 survivors fleeing dangerous situations got help with moving and housing expenses through the Coalition’s Emergency Assistance Fund.


Needs

The Coalition works hard every day to end domestic and sexual violence. We raise awareness about the issue and make sure local programs have the resources they need to provide services to survivors. We develop programs that teach a new generation about violence-free relationships and advocate for policies that protect victims. As we continue our work to end domestic and sexual violence, we will rely on allies like you to join with us in this life-saving work. We’ve always run a tight ship, but as funding for domestic and sexual violence services has decreased in recent years, our budget has to go even farther. We have to be able to accomplish even more with the same or even less money. Your support is more important than ever before.

Other ways to donate, support, or volunteer You can also donate to the TN Coalition by mailing a check to TN Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence, 2 International Plaza Dr. Ste. 425, Nashville, TN 37217-2019. Volunteers to help out in the office are always welcome!
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Civil Rights, Social Action, Advocacy / Women's Rights
Secondary Organization Category Crime & Legal - Related / Protection Against Abuse
Tertiary Organization Category Community Improvement, Capacity Building / Alliances & Advocacy
Areas of Service
Areas Served
TN

Board Chair Statement

As a career prosecutor who has significant experience prosecuting both domestic violence and child exploitation cases, I have seen the devastating short and long term effects on children and adult victims of sexual and domestic violence. Having first learned about domestic violence in law school through training conducted by the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence over 20 years ago, I have come to appreciate the significant contributions this organization has made and continues to make in the lives of survivors of violence through its exceptional public policy work, advocacy, education, legal assistance, and other services and resources. Because domestic and sexual violence persist and because of the excellent work of the Coalition, I have sought to remain involved over the years and am proud to have the opportunity to chair the board this year.

CEO Statement

After serving as the Executive Director of the Coalition for almost thirty years, I often say that I have the greatest job in the world. Every morning I get up and think about how we can change the world today! The Coalition serves as a vehicle to organize people who want to make the world a safer place. We believe that a group of thoughtful, committed individuals can change the world, and we invite you to join us by making a financial investment in this lifesaving work.

Programs
Description

 

The Coalition works on behalf of victims by monitoring legislation and advocating for laws that protect victims’ rights. We analyze legislation to insure that victims' rights are respected and that new laws don't inadvertently harm victims. When laws need to be changed, we assist with drafting bills that will address the problems identified by victims and advocates. Our executive director serves as our registered lobbyist at the Tennessee General Assembly. With more than thirty years experience, she works hard to make sure that Tennessee's laws protect victims and hold perpetrators accountable.

In addition, the Coalition is the administrative arm of the Domestic Violence State Coordinating Council. The Council, comprising representatives from law enforcement, the courts, and victim services, was established by the Tennessee General Assembly to develop model policies and training curriculums for law enforcement agencies and the courts, and to certify and monitor batterer’s intervention programs.

 

Budget 100000
Category Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Women's Rights
Population Served Victims, Females, Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Short Term Success

Each year, the Coalition monitors nearly 3,000 bills in the Tennessee General Assembly to ensure that victims of domestic violence and sexual assault are protected and perpetrators held accountable.

Long term Success

Since its inception the Coalition has successfully advocated for passage of more than 125 new laws to protect victims and hold perpetrators accountable.

Program Success Monitored By

The Coalition measures the success of its policy advocacy by the number and quality of laws passed and policies instituted to protect victims and hold perpetrators accountable.

Examples of Program Success

In 2013, the Coalition worked with the governor's office to achieve a $250,000 increase in state funding for domestic violence shelters. In 2012, the Coalition successfully advocated for several important pieces of state legislation. As a result, adult victims of sexual assault or domestic abuse can now seek medical treatment without fear that providers will report the crimes to law enforcement without their consent. Judges can now order domestic abusers to complete a batterers’ intervention program certified by the Domestic Violence State Coordinating Council as part of alternative sentencing. Abusers can only be ordered to a non-certified program if no certified program is available in that community. Penalties for a second or subsequent domestic assault have been increased, and a new offense has been created for knowingly preventing a person from calling for emergency assistance or rendering unusable a telephone that would be used to call for help.

Description

The Coalition provides help to victims directly through its Immigrant Legal Clinic, Sexual Assault Legal Clinic, and Abuse Survivors Emergency Assistance Fund. Since its inception in 2004, the Immigrant Legal Clinic has provided legal advice and representation in immigration cases to more than 1,000 victims of domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking statewide.

The Diane Stewart Abuse Survivors Emergency Assistance Fund provides emergency assistance to victims of domestic and sexual violence to help them become safer. Throughout the year, domestic and sexual violence programs refer victims to the Coalition for emergency assistance. Victims also contact the Coalition directly. Program specialists with training and experience in working with domestic and sexual violence victims help victims develop safety strategies. Payment of up to $240 is made directly to vendors. Examples of fundable expenses include moving and transportation expenses and costs associated with new, safer housing. This project began in December 2011 with a $5,000 grant from the Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee. Today, the project provides assistance statewide to more than 180 victims per year.

Budget 480000
Category Human Services, General/Other Emergency Assistance
Population Served Victims, Females, Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Short Term Success 100% of clients completing client satisfaction surveys during the most recent project period reported that they were safer because of the services they received from the Coalition.
Long term Success
  • Clients receiving services from the Coalition will report increased safety as a result of the services.
  • Clients receiving services from the Coalition will report that they have overcome at least one barrier to safety.
  • In appropriate cases, clients receiving services from the Coalition will cooperate in prosecution of their abusers.
Program Success Monitored By Clients are asked to complete a client satisfaction survey periodically during the time they are being served and at the completion of services.
Examples of Program Success
In 2015, we provided direct legal services to 420 victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and trafficking. Because of the Clinic, immigrant and trafficked victims and their children need no longer choose between safety and deportation. The Clinic is the only service providing legal representation statewide to immigrant victims of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, stalking, and trafficking.
 
In 2015, the Coalition's Abuse Survivor Emergency Fund provided emergency assistance to 174 victims of domestic and sexual violence. According to recent outcome data, at the time of service, 100% of 60 survivors reported that the assistance they received helped them feel safer, learn how to access benefits or community resources, and remove barriers to safety. We were able to follow up with 25 of these survivors after three months and they all reported that they continued to feel safer, that they had received help from community resources, and that the assistance had removed barriers to safety. One survivor contacted the Coalition after her boyfriend strangled and severely beat her. She stated, "I love him, but I cannot survive this relationship." The Coalition provided her with rent assistance for safe housing so she could move forward with her life independently.

 
Description

The Coalition provides training and technical assistance on domestic and sexual violence to communities throughout Tennessee. Each year the Coalition hosts an Annual Conference, during which advocates and professionals from across Tennessee join together for three days of networking, skill building, and training from local and nationally recognized experts in the fields of domestic and sexual violence.

Coalition staff members organize and provide training at the Senator Tommy Burks Victim Assistance Academy, held annually at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga. Named in memory of the late Senator Tommy Burks, the Academy provides comprehensive, basic-level victim assistance training to victim services providers and allied professionals.

Through our Rape Prevention and Education project, the Coalition hosts a statewide Rape Prevention and Education Institute, social media trainings in the three regions of the state, and maintenance of the prevention resource database. The purpose of this project, supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, is to strengthen sexual violence prevention efforts across the state through increased awareness, education and training, and crisis hotline support.

In addition, we offer a wide variety of training opportunities including Violence Against Women training for new advocates, regional trainings, P.O.S.T.-approved law-enforcement training, and targeted training for judges, law enforcement executives, executive directors of domestic and sexual violence programs, and victim advocates. Technical assistance is offered on creating trauma-informed services, sustainability, technology safety, and program and policy development.

Budget 120000
Category Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other Civil Rights, Social Action & Advocacy, General/Other
Population Served Victims, Females, Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Short Term Success
The Coalition's training program has the following goals: 
 
• Improve and expand services for victims/survivors of domestic and sexual violence by providing useful information, training and technical assistance to programs, communities, law enforcement/criminal justice personnel and judges statewide.
• Increase the safety of victims by enhancing the capacity of the domestic and sexual violence programs through necessary training and technical assistance. 
Long term Success The training and technical assistance provided by the Coalition builds the capacity for victim advocates and professional allies to not only better serve women victimized by domestic and sexual violence, but for them to work more effectively with criminal justice agencies to reduce violence against women, increase safety for victims and hold perpetrators accountable for their actions. Through its training, technical assistance, and information and resources provision and distribution, the Coalition works to build community capacity for providing services that promote the integrity and self-sufficiency of victims, improve their access to resources, and provide options for victims seeking safety from violence.
Program Success Monitored By Trainees complete a training survey at the completion of every training session presented by the Coalition. In addition, the Coalition develops and disseminates an annual survey to agency consumers to evaluate the quality of services they received including information, training, technical assistance, referrals, and resources
Examples of Program Success In 2014, the Coalition conducted 79 training opportunities for 2,217 domestic and sexual violence program staff and allied professionals, and provided 10,989 technical assistance services. 93% of individuals who attended Coalition trainings agreed or strongly agreed that they “a great deal at this training session.”
Description The Coalition works diligently to access state, federal, and private resources on behalf of our member programs. The Tennessee Rural Sexual Assault Services Expansion Project enhances the safety of child, youth, and adult sexual assault victims living in rural counties in Tennessee by making services more available and accessible. Our Tennessee Sexual Assault Response Project helps local communities actively respond to sexual assault by developing Sexual Assault Response Teams and supporting Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners. Through a partnership with the Department of Health, the Coalition supports sexual assault intervention services and crisis hotlines across the state. The Coalition also provides extensive, on-site trainings on a variety of topics to local programs throughout the state.
Budget 800000
Category Community Development, General/Other Community Development, General/Other
Population Served Victims, Females, Immigrant, Newcomers, Refugees
Short Term Success The short term goal of the Coalition's support for local communities is to enhance the capacity of Tennessee's domestic and sexual violence programs to provide services to victims.
Long term Success The long term goal of the Coalition's support for local communities is to insure that adequate services are available statewide for victims of domestic and sexual violence.
Program Success Monitored By Local programs report monthly on project activities and outcomes.
Examples of Program Success In 2013, the Coalition successfully advocated for $250,000 in additional
state funding for domestic violence shelters to be added to the
state budget. In addition, the Coalition invested $400,000 in local community efforts to end domestic and sexual violence. 
One of the clients helped through this project was a 19-year-old college student with a new promotion at work and great grades in college. Her life was going great until someone she thought was a friend
raped her. She went to a local hospital for help. Because of a partnership between the Coalition and sexual assault centers across the state, services were available—even in rural counties like hers. She received a forensic rape exam and an advocate, who helped her navigate the court system, access community services, and get individual counseling.
CEO Comments
Board Chair
Board Chair Ms Rebecca Wells Demaree
Company Affiliation Cornelius & Collins Law Firm
Term Jan 2017 to Dec 2017
Email rwdemaree@me.com
Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Ms. Katie Atkins PharmMD Solutions, LLCVoting
Ms. Angie Benefield Family Resource Agency, Inc.Voting
Ms Carrie Daughtrey U.S. Attorney's OfficeVoting
Ms Sarah Davis Office of the District Attorney General, 16th DistrictVoting
Ms Rebecca Wells Demaree Cornelius & CollinsVoting
Ms Carey Elzey The Chrichton GroupVoting
Ms. Rachel Cook Freeman Sexual Assault CenterVoting
Ms Mollie Gass Rudy, Winstead, Turner, PLLC
Mr. Graham Hodges Verizon WirelessVoting
Ms. Regina McDevitt Partnership for Families, Children and AdultsVoting
Ms. Stacey Miller Tennessee Correctional Services, JacksonVoting
Ms. Rachel Stutts Attorney at Law and Community VolunteerVoting
Ms. Tina Tuggle Tennessee TitansVoting
Ms. Anna Whalley Shelby County Rape Crisis CenterVoting
Ms. Sharon Wolfe S/S Wolfe CounselingVoting
Ms Micki Yearwood Voting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 2
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 14
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 15
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 50%
Does the organization have written Board Selection Criteria? Yes
Does the organization have a written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage of Board Members making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of Board Members making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Does the Board include Client Representation? Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 4
Board CoChair
Board CoChair Ms. Sharon Wolfe
Company Affiliation S/S Wolfe Counseling
Term Jan 2017 to Dec 2017
Email sharonwolfebs@gmail.com
Standing Committees
Executive
Risk Management Provisions
Directors & Officers Policy
Disability Insurance
General Property Coverage
Medical Health Insurance
Workers Compensation & Employers' Liability
CEO Comments
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Ms. Kathy Walsh
Term Start Jan 1988
Email kwalsh@tncoalition.org
Experience Kathy Walsh is the Executive Director of the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence. With more than three decades of experience in crisis intervention, Ms. Walsh provides training and technical assistance to communities, monitors state and federal legislation, and works on public policy issues of concern to victims of domestic and sexual violence. Ms. Walsh developed a model Law Enforcement Training Project through which more than 8,500 police officers have been trained to date. Ms. Walsh co-authored the Domestic Violence Interdiction Law Enforcement Curriculum and the Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault Law Enforcement Curriculum being used by law enforcement agencies throughout the country. She also co-authored the Tennessee Model Law Enforcement Policy and State Standards for Domestic Violence Programs. As a member of the Tennessee Domestic Violence State Coordinating Council, Ms. Walsh assisted in the creation of the Domestic Abuse Bench Book, the Model Domestic Court Policy and State Rules and Certification Process for Batterer's Intervention Programs. Ms. Walsh was chosen as the recipient of the 2003 Award for Outstanding Advocacy and Community Work in Ending Sexual Violence presented by the National Sexual Violence Resource Center. In her 27th year as Director of the Coalition, Ms. Walsh has successfully advocated for more than 125 new laws to improve safety for victims of domestic and sexual violence and assisted in the development of domestic violence shelters, rape crisis centers, and community task forces throughout the state.
Staff
Full Time Staff 16
Part Time Staff 2
Volunteers 22
Contractors 1
Retention Rate 57%
Plans & Policies
Does the organization have a documented Fundraising Plan? Yes
Does the organization have an approved Strategic Plan? Yes
Number of years Strategic Plan Considers 3
When was Strategic Plan adopted? Nov 2015
In case of a change in leadership, is a Management Succession plan in place? No
Does the organization have a Policies and Procedures Plan? Yes
Does the organization have a Nondiscrimination Policy? Yes
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Center for Nonprofit Management Excellence Network2010
Community Shares2010
National Coalition Against Domestic Violence2010
National Network to End Domestic Violence2006
National Association to End Sexual Violence2007
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
BHT Access to Care AwardCenter for Nonprofit Management2015
Senior Staff
Title Director of Program Development
Experience/Biography

Dawn Harper is the Director of Program Development for the Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence. Prior to joining the Coalition, she worked as a Program Coordinator for Vanderbilt Children’s Hospital. Dawn served as liaison between patients and providers to ensure collaborative, coordinated care for all patients. Dawn created, submitted, and received approval for accreditation with the American Cleft Palate-Craniofacial Association. In 2004, Dawn became a Forensic Interviewer for the Nashville Children’s Alliance, where she interviewed over 1,300 children who are alleged victims of abuse, including sexual and physical abuse. She also interviewed children who had witnessed violent crimes. Dawn served on Tennessee Child Advocacy Centers Forensic Interviewers (TCACFI) board and often testified in criminal and juvenile court.

In 2006, she became the Child Protective Investigative Team (CPIT) Coordinator for the Nashville Children’s Alliance. As a CPIT Coordinator, she was responsible for the day to day operations of the Davidson County child abuse team that has been working as a multidisciplinary team since 1985. The CPIT team consists of Metro Nashville Police Department, the District Attorney’s Office, Department of Children’s Services, and Our Kids. Dawn convened and facilitated CPIT and facilitated and organized CPIT management/supervisors meetings to implement recommendations for the team. Dawn served as the team's liaison with community agencies and coordinate efforts to develop additional resources. She managed the NCAtrak database to track cases of child abuse and promoted team member communication, case classification and disposition, and usage of NCAtrak to effectively manage case. Dawn supervised the Forensic Interviewer Program, provided supervision to the forensic interviewers, testified in criminal and juvenile court proceedings as the supervisor for the Forensic Interviewer program, and ensured all program outcomes were reported. She provided training for Multi-Disciplinary Teams statewide and participated in developing a curriculum and facilitated statewide training to DCS and Law Enforcement. She also served on the Domestic Violence Death Review Board in Davidson County.
Title Director of Finance & Administration
Experience/Biography
CEO Comments
 
 
 
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2017
Projected Revenue $2,251,797.00
Projected Expenses $2,251,797.00
Endowment Spending Policy N/A
Endowment Spending Percentage (if selected) 0%
Detailed Financials
Revenue and ExpensesHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Revenue$2,290,117$2,355,878$2,206,377
Total Expenses$2,185,570$2,326,806$2,181,806
Revenue Less Expenses$104,547$29,072$24,571
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$140,565$0$0
Government Contributions$1,949,510$2,068,171$1,978,261
Federal$0$0$0
State$0$0$0
Local$0$0$0
Unspecified$1,949,510$2,068,171$1,978,261
Individual Contributions$162,260$245,082$192,099
$0$0$0
$24,001$21,725$16,650
Investment Income, Net of Losses$384$430$355
Membership Dues$12,522$18,890$17,429
Special Events$0$0$0
Revenue In-Kind$0$0$0
Other$875$1,580$1,583
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$2,041,008$2,159,707$2,023,950
Administration Expense$96,962$122,111$115,262
Fundraising Expense$47,600$44,988$42,594
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.051.011.01
Program Expense/Total Expenses93%93%93%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue2%2%2%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$715,547$750,467$676,212
Current Assets$715,547$750,467$676,212
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$142,642$282,109$236,926
Total Net Assets$572,905$468,358$439,286
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities5.022.662.85
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovernment Grants $1,949,510Government Grants $2,068,171Government Grants $1,978,261
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions, Gifts, & Grants $162,260Contributions, Gifts and Grants $245,082Contributions, Gifts, & Grants $192,099
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountFoundations & Corporations $140,565Program Revenue $21,725Membership Dues $17,429
Capital Campaign
Is the organization currently conducting a Capital Campaign for an endowment or the purchase of a major asset? No
Capital Campaign Goal $0.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit
TN Charitable Solicitations Registration Yes - Expires June 2017
GivingMatters.com Financial Comments
Financials taken from the 990.
Financial documents completed by John R. Poole, CPA.
Comments provided by Nicole Rose 07/17/2017. NR
Nonprofit Tennessee Coalition to End Domestic and Sexual Violence
Address 2 International Plaza Drive
Suite 425
Nashville, TN 37217 2019
Primary Phone (615) 386-9406
Contact Email kwalsh@tncoalition.org
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Kathy Walsh
Board Chair Ms Rebecca Wells Demaree
Board Chair Company Affiliation Cornelius & Collins Law Firm
Year of Incorporation 1984
Former Names
Tennessee Task Force Against Domestic Violence
Tennessee Coalition Against Sexual Assault
Tennessee Coalition Against Domestic and Sexual Violence

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