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Reconciliation Inc

Last Updated: 5/28/2014 4:56:21 PM

Nonprofit

Reconciliation Inc

Address

P.O. Box 90827


Nashville, TN 37209-
Davidson County

Primary Phone

(615) 554-5075

Primary Fax

(615) 292-6371

Facebook

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CEO/Executive Director

Malinda Davenport Wilson, Ph.D.

Board Chair

Mr. Phil LeGrone

Board Chair Company Affiliation

Christ Church Cathedral

Board Members

View

Year of Incorporation

1984

Former Names

Reconciliation Ministries, Inc. (2009)

Reconciliation, Inc. (2014)



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Overview

Family Reconciliation Center (formerly Reconciliation, Inc.) is a nonprofit organization providing services and programs to reach out to youth and families who are innocent victims of crime by promoting family unification, human rights, and advocacy to strengthen the family unit as a whole and reduce inter-generational incarceration.

Our vision is reconciling husband to wife, parent to child, sister to brother, offender to community. Family Reconciliation Center recognizes that the families of the incarcerated are forgotten victims of crime. Innocent of any wrong-doing, they often are blamed and ostracized by friends and the community.

 

Through individual and family support, assistance and advocacy, the Family Reconciliation Center creates an environment where families can support one another in order to meet their basic physical, emotional, and spiritual needs; strengthen and maintain family bonds throughout the crisis of incarceration; and aid in readjustment upon release of loved ones, thereby reducing recidivism and making a safer community for everyone.

Family Reconciliation Center is a supportive environment and a healing community for individuals dealing with the effects of life controlling issues of incarceration, addiction, domestic violence, abuse and insufficient empowerment. The goal of the Center is to connect individuals to their community - a network of support- and family reunification.

More Background

Programs

Guest House

Separate Prisons

Youth Group

Family Reunifcation

New Beginning Society

View Program Details

Financials

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.

Projected Revenue

$153,800

Projected Expenses

$153,800

View Financial Details


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Related Information

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