Nurses for Newborns of Tennessee
50 Vantage Way
Suite 101
Nashville TN 37228-1553
Baby Ellie - born 28 weeks (2 months early)
Baby Ellie at 10 months
Nurse Barbara conducting home well-baby visit
Mission Statement

Nurses for Newborns of Tennessee exists to provide a safety net for families most at-risk in order to prevent infant mortality, child abuse and neglect by providing in-home nursing visits which promote healthcare, education, and positive parenting skills.

Leadership
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Amanda Peltz
Board Chair Ms. Mary Scott Throne
Board Chair Company Affiliation Caterpillar Financial
History & Background
Year of Incorporation 1991
Former Names
Nurses for Newborns Foundation
Organization's type of tax exempt status 501-C3
Financial Summary
 
 
Projected Expenses $867,600.00
Projected Annual Revenue $867,600.00 (2017)
Statements
Mission

Nurses for Newborns of Tennessee exists to provide a safety net for families most at-risk in order to prevent infant mortality, child abuse and neglect by providing in-home nursing visits which promote healthcare, education, and positive parenting skills.

Background

WHAT WE DO:

Nurses for Newborns of Tennessee (NFN) is a registered nurse, prevention based home visitation program dedicated to reducing infant moralit and child abuse/neglect by providing health assessments, parenting skills, education and support to at-risk families.  NFN provides a variety of in-home nursing care services to medically fragile infants, assistance to mothers who are mentally, intellectual or medically challenged (including cases involving drug, alcohol, and nicotine use and/or addictions during pregnancy and after delivery), and prenatal and after-delivery nursing care for teen mothers.  Supporting services include assessments, positive-parenting education, review and instruction on home environmental safety, and education/referral assistance to more thoroughly respond to specific needs of clients.

HOW WE GOT STARTED:

Nurses for Newborns Foundation was founded in 1992 in St. Louis, MO by agency founder Sharon Rohrbach, RN.  Our agency expanded to Nashville in October 2001 through the generous support of (then) NFL Tennessee Titans's Offensive Tackle Fred Miller and his wife Kim.  Since that time, NFN nurses have completed more than 43,290 in-home nurse visits impacting 9,381 families across Middle Tennessee. 

HOW WE CONTINUE TO FULFILL OUR MISSION:

NFN serves as a safety net for families most at risk.  We have variety of strategic partners that support us in our mission.  Theses include area hospitals, health care providers and other non-profits assist in identifiying families in need and referring to Nurses for Newborns.  We receive funding through multiple state grants, five United Ways, who provide us with programmatic support; The Community Foundation of Middle Tennessee, who serves as a key facilitator for financial and volunteer support; and additional contributions from corporate, foundation and individual supporters. 
Impact

Nurses for Newborns is dedicated to preventing infant mortality, child abuse and neglect in Tennessee.  Our model of care is a unique prevention based home visitation program with the expertise of registered nurses.  We focus on health assessments, education and linkage to needed resources. 
In 2014, NFN has accomplished much in the prevention of abuse, neglect and infant mortality. 
1.  NFN is currently working with the State of Tennessee on the Promising Approach Project to be recognized as a evidence based model for home visitation.    
2. NFN is currently a leader with a Neonatal Absence Syndrome, NAS (a term used for a group of problems a baby experiences when withdrawing from exposure to narcotics) Coalition.  The coalition will develop a standard of care for families effected by NAS, a pilot of education and outcome methods. 
 
As NFN looks ahead, our goals are in place to help us achieve quality services for high risk populations.  
1. NFN works to improve infant immunization rates therefore decreasing preventable diseases. 
 
2. NFN continues to link babies to long-term quality healthcare  by increasing "medical home" coverage. 
 
3. NFN promotes household safety including safe sleep practices.  
 
4.  NFN continues to support culturally sensitive interaction with Hispanic families through the use of our medical interpretation support during nurse home visits.  

5. NFN continues to provide client education on smoking and obesity, which is a significant health factor that impacts birth outcomes, and is a risk factor for premature births. 

Needs Nurses for Newborns of Tennessee works to reduce infant mortality by ensuring families caring for young children have the sufficient skills and knowledge to help their child thrive.  Our objectives help children safely reach their first birthday in good health and that they are being cared for by competent parents attuned and able to respond to their needs.  

1. General financial support to offset agency expenses associated with nurse in-home visits.

2. Donor designated financial support:  If there is a specific geographic (i.e. county) or educational topic(s) you would like to support, please contact our agency and we will be happy to meet to discuss your giving interests in greater detail. (i.e. 24/7 nurses communication for clients)

3. Corporate or congregational support (underwriting) of an agency nurse position.

4. Assistance with public relations/marketing for our organization, funding campaigns and special events. 

5. Community volunteers (interns, donation coordinators, and special event support).  Volunteers are needed to help support our agency fundraising events and benefit auctions.  Self-coordinated donation drives are especially needed to replenish infant consumables (diapers, wipes, lotion, Dreft laundry detergent, etc.).  We would be happy to talk with your organization about this, and provide supporting materials to help you spread the word!


Other ways to donate, support, or volunteer Nurses for Newborns is grateful for all donations and we ensure that we are good stewards of your gifts, whether it be time, talent, funding or baby items.  Because our nurses never leave a home without the knowledge that the baby will have the basics necessary to survive (i.e. portable crib, formula, diapers, blankets) we accept in-kind donations.  Without the generosity of funding dollars, NFN will not be able to send nurses to the most vulnerable (and our largest client population), the medically fragile babies.  Our nurses are on call 24/7 in order to provide the best care.  Each nurse has a cell phone for communication.  In addition, we provide interpreters should a client need this service.  We seek funding to pay for client visits, operating costs (including cell phone charges), baby items and staff computers.  Donations can be made by calling our office for drop off times, mailing a check to our office or by contributing online.  
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Health Care / Nursing
Secondary Organization Category Human Services / Children's and Youth Services
Tertiary Organization Category Education / Parent & Teacher Groups
Areas of Service
Areas Served
TN - Davidson
TN - Montgomery
TN - Rutherford
TN - Sumner
TN - Williamson
TN - Maury
Nurse home visitation service coverage is available in six counties in Middle Tennessee (county-wide) including Davidson, Rutherford, Sumner, Montgomery, Maury and Williamson.
Board Chair Statement


CEO Statement

- How is it possible that babies in the United States have less of a chance of seeing their first birthdays than those in Beijing or Cuba?  

- That within our own country, Tennessee continues to be ranked among the bottom in losing more infants before their first birthday? 

Nurses for Newborns serves families that each have unique issues.  Many are poor and have had few positive role models for parenting.  They lack basic needs such as food, shelter and safety.  Our nurses help provide the linkage to meet not only the basic needs but the education to promote positive and healthy families.  Other families have major health issues for either the caregivers or infant.  These families are dealing with the physical and emotional stress that comes with sick family members.  Our nurses help provide the knowledge and support to assist these families. 
We are very proud of our work.  The babies we see are much more likely to see their first birthdays and are much less likely to be abused or neglected during their childhoods.   With your help we can provide families with medically fragile babies, teen parents with newborns and moms who are intellectually, mentally or physically limited and trying their best to care for their babies, the chance for a brighter tomorrow.  On behalf of the babies, thank you for your generous support of Nurses for Newborns. 
Programs
Description

Nurse In-Home Visitation Program: This program serves three primary populations.  The largest percent (69% in FY15) of cases are medically fragile infants who have typically spent time in a Neonatal Intensive Care Unit. Services begin when the infant transitions from hospital to home, and may continue up to age two of the child. This program also responds to cases involving caregiver and/or infant exposure to drugs, alcohol, tobacco, and/or other harmful substances.  The second largest population (25% in FY15) we serve are pregnant women, and/or women who have just given birth who are mentally or medically challenged.  This includes women with chronic disease such as multiple sclerosis (MS), hypertension, mental health issues (including depression) and anxiety disorder.  The third population (6% in FY15) serves the needs of teen mothers, 19 years of age and younger.  Services may begin during pregnancy and continue till the child reaches age 2.  Services focus on teaching the caregiver, healthy life choices, growth & development,  "positive parenting skills" and additional goal setting that benefit the health and welfare of both the mother and her child.  Nurses for Newborns In-Home Visitation clients may have any or all of the risk factors noted.  We identify and prioritize the unique needs of each client and then work to ensure a positive and sustainable healthy outcome for the baby and family. 

Budget 1001869
Category Health Care, General/Other Early Intervention & Prevention
Population Served Infants to Preschool (under age 5), Families, People/Families with of People with Physical Disabilities
Short Term Success Nurse In-Home Visitation Program outcomes include child immunization are current (90%), infant has a safe sleeping environment and education to support it (95%), infant has a medical home/stable healthcare provider (90%) and caregivers/mothers will be screened for depression by the third visit (95%). 
Long term Success Nurses for Newborns In-Home Visitation Program is making a difference in families and our community by reducing abuse/neglect and infant mortality. 
Program Success Monitored By Registered nurses who visit clients record all assessments, screening results, education topics taught and self reports into our electronic database.  Outcomes are measured at each visit.  Assessments include, infant, maternal and home.  Education topics include but are not limited to growth & development, safe sleep, breastfeeding, positive parenting, alcohol/tobacco use and nutrition.  Self reports include healthy eating journals and immunization records. 
Examples of Program Success There are many heartbreaking stories of unintentional abuse due to lack of knowledge or resources and tragedies of preventable infant sleep related deaths makes those statistics even more real.  Our in-home visitation program is the prevention step before treatment or tragedy occurs.  For instance, there is a mother who has a newborn baby weighing only 4lbs at birth, which has spent weeks on end in the NICU and cared for around the clock by skilled nurses.  It is vital for the baby to be given medicine, to eat through a G-tube and to be monitored properly.  Or premature twins are born to a 16-year-old single mother who is struggling to know how to feed and take care of her newborns.  A father an infant son is moving in and out of transitional housing.  Caregivers like these are overwhelmed with the responsibility of caring for these fragile babies and dire situations.
CEO Comments

Nurses for Newborns is a resource to those who have found themselves in unique health situations with their babies.  Our clients range in education level and income level.  Whether the client is the highest risk Tennesseans; mothers living in poverty who have very little social support and experience an unplanned/unintended pregnancy. Or the mother with a high paying corporate position who is financially stable and surrounded with family and finds herself with a medically fragile infant.  Clients may be a teenager with depression.  Other clients may be in transitional housing and no transportation, therefore creating an access to healthcare issue.  NFN is able to reach clients in their environment and assist them with their unique needs. 

NFN is committed to improving the quality of life for these specially challenged infants, and their caregivers. Agency nurses work to help parents live more fully, to build healthy relationships, and to become successful caregivers for their child. This involves nurse provide instruction on a variety of topics. Our nurses also make sure families have basic infant care items for their child, are providing a safe sleeping place, and no safety threats are present within the home living environments.

Board Chair
Board Chair Ms. Mary Scott Throne
Company Affiliation Caterpillar Financial
Term July 2016 to June 2018
Email maryscott.throne@cat.com
Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Dr. Shari Barkin AmbassadorVanderbilt School of MedicineNonVoting
Ms. Judy Jean Chapman AmbassadorCommunity VolunteerNonVoting
Ms. Marty Conrad Immediate Past PresidentVanderbilt School of NursingVoting
Dr. Colleen Conway-Welch AmbassadorVanderbilt School of NursingNonVoting
Dr. Barbara Engelhardt AmbassadorMonroe Carell Children's HospitalNonVoting
Ms. Annettee Eskind AmbassadorCommunity VolunteerNonVoting
Ms. Pat Gizelar Community VolunteerVoting
Dr. Connie Graves AmbassadorTennessee Maternal Fetal MedicineNonVoting
Dr. Mark Hughes Grace PediatricsVoting
Ms. Rosalind Kurita AmbassadorCommunity VolunteerNonVoting
Mrs. Susan Lonon President ElectThe TennesseanVoting
Dr. Melanie Lutenbacher AmbassadorVanderbilt School of NursingNonVoting
Ms. Crayonnia Mallory CATVoting
Ms. Linda Norman AmbassadorVanderbilt School of NursingNonVoting
Mrs. Brooke Paschali Community VolunteerVoting
Ms. Sarah Pettigrew CBRE Inc.NonVoting
Ms. Katie Tarr CPA-LBMCVoting
Mrs. Mary Scott Thorne PresidentCaterpillar FinancialVoting
Dr. Susanne Tropez-Sims AmbassadorMeharry Medical CollegeNonVoting
Dr. William Walsh AmbassadorMonroe Carell Children's HospitalNonVoting
Dr. Catherine Wiggleton Vanderbilt Childrens Clinic HendersonvilleVoting
Shirley Zeitlin AmbassadorShirley Zeitlin and CompanyNonVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 1
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 9
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 9
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 2
Board Meeting Attendance % 80%
Does the organization have written Board Selection Criteria? No
Does the organization have a written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage of Board Members making Monetary Contributions 100%
Percentage of Board Members making In-Kind Contributions 70%
Does the Board include Client Representation? No
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 6
Standing Committees
Advisory Board
Risk Management Provisions
Automobile Insurance & Umbrella or Excess Insurance
Commercial General Insurance
Commercial General Liability & D and O & Umbrella or Excess & Automobile & Professional
Medical Malpractice
Computer Equipment & Software
General Property Coverage & Professional Liability
Medical Malpractice
Life Insurance
Medical Health Insurance
Disability Insurance
CEO Comments
 Nurses for Newborns functions under one 501(c)(3) license, with the headquarters being in St. Louis, Missouri and our office is in Tennessee.  As such, the St. Louis board has fiduciary responsibilities and oversees our agency finance.  (Note: the 990 listed in financials includes both states)  The Chairman of the Board in St. Louis is Ms. Teri Murry.  However, money raised in Tennessee-stays in Tennessee.  Our office is responsible for securing the needed funds to maintain operations.  The Tennessee Advisory Board assists in this function by their personal donations, fundraising works and promotion of our mission and operations.  
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director Ms. Amanda Peltz
Term Start July 2015
Email amanda.peltz@nursesfornewborns.org
Experience

Amanda Peltz has joined Nurses for Newborns of Tennessee as the Executive Director.  Amanda has strong experience in leading an organization with a mission to serve vulnerable populations.  She comes to NFN from Autism Tennessee where she has served as the Executive Director.  She has been responsible for the strategic oversight of all programmatic, financial, administrative, internal and external agency activities.  Amanda earned her undergraduate degree from the University of Alabama and her Master's degree in Human, Organization and Community Development from Vanderbilt University.  Amanda was recognized as one of Nashville's Top Forty Under 40 by the Nashville Business Journal and received the EP Maxwell J. Scheifer Distinguished Service Award. 

Former CEOs
NameTerm
Mrs. Vicki Schwartz Beaver RN, MSNApr 2006 - July 2008
Staff
Full Time Staff 5
Part Time Staff 13
Volunteers 85
Contractors 1
Retention Rate 95%
Plans & Policies
Does the organization have a documented Fundraising Plan? Yes
Does the organization have an approved Strategic Plan? Yes
Number of years Strategic Plan Considers 3
When was Strategic Plan adopted? 2012
In case of a change in leadership, is a Management Succession plan in place? Yes
Does the organization have a Policies and Procedures Plan? Yes
Does the organization have a Nondiscrimination Policy? Yes
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Center for Nonprofit Management Excellence Network2002
United Way Member Agency2001
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Salute to Excellence - "Making a Difference" AwardCenter for Non-profit Management2009
NFN's "Bridge to the Future" program - Recognized as an effective, evidence-informed programAgency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ)2008
"Salute To Exellence" - Collaboration College AwardHCA & Center for Non-Profit Management2012
Promising Approach - Evidence-based research modelState of Tennessee - Dept. of Health2012
Senior Staff
Title Accounting Coordinator
Experience/Biography Pat joined NFNT in 2008, and oversees our agency's finances.  She oversees accounts receivable, payable, and assists executive leadership in budget planning at both the program and agency operations level.  Ms. Hale recently became a certified tax preparer for filers of the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC).
Title Nursing Director for Clinical Practice
Experience/Biography Lacey received her BSN from Union University and has been an obstetric/pediatric nurse for the past twelve years.  As Nursing Director for Clinical Practices, she is responsible for hiring and training the nursing staff as well as direct supervision of nurses. 
Title Development Director
Experience/Biography
CEO Comments

Nurses for Newborns of Tennessee employs registered nurses to complete home-visits to a high-risk population.  Our nurses utilize proprietary clinical guidelines, evidenced based screening tools and practices to improve the health and well-being for our families.  Visits are recorded in our electronic record and data reviewed for quality purposes.  Nurses provide needed care in the transition from hospital to home and may continue services until the child's second birthday if needed.  Nurses are the safety-net for their families.  Partnerships and collaboration are important to meeting the many needs of our families.  Working with others provides needed services and funding.  Our five United Way Partners help support our visits and help us to network with other community groups.  Community Foundations and State Grants are essential to our managing our resources. 

Foundation Comments The strategic plan was drafted with the national office in St. Louis and includes goals for Tennessee and St. Louis.
 
 
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start July 01 2016
Fiscal Year End June 30 2017
Projected Revenue $867,600.00
Projected Expenses $867,600.00
Endowment Spending Policy N/A
Endowment Spending Percentage (if selected) 0%
Detailed Financials
Revenue and ExpensesHelpFinancial data for prior years is entered by foundation staff based on the documents submitted by nonprofit organizations.Foundation staff members enter this information to assure consistency in the presentation of financial data across all organizations.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Revenue$4,945,417$4,283,888$4,350,982
Total Expenses$4,471,077$4,210,439$4,051,850
Revenue Less Expenses$474,340$73,449$299,132
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201620152014
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$0$0$0
Government Contributions$2,900,078$2,444,081$2,333,404
Federal$0$0$0
State$0$0$0
Local$0$0$0
Unspecified$2,900,078$2,444,081$2,333,404
Individual Contributions$1,247,885$1,145,688$1,338,202
$0$0$0
$113,083$87,070$150,944
Investment Income, Net of Losses$2,164$1,416$1,088
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$664,011$587,387$511,148
Revenue In-Kind$0$0$0
Other$18,196$18,246$16,196
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$3,553,919$3,350,982$3,238,270
Administration Expense$358,754$360,363$356,405
Fundraising Expense$558,404$499,094$457,175
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.111.021.07
Program Expense/Total Expenses79%80%80%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue12%12%11%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$2,259,024$1,816,810$1,745,000
Current Assets$2,062,756$1,602,717$1,593,776
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$205,885$238,011$239,650
Total Net Assets$2,053,139$1,578,799$1,505,850
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities10.026.736.65
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountGovernment Grants $2,900,078Government Grants $2,444,081Government Grants and Contracts $2,333,404
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions, Gifts and Grants $1,247,885Contributions, Gifts, and Grants $1,145,688Contributions, Gifts, and Grants $1,338,202
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountFundraising Events $664,011Fundraising Events $587,387Special Events $511,148
Capital Campaign
Is the organization currently conducting a Capital Campaign for an endowment or the purchase of a major asset? No
Capital Campaign Goal $0.00
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit
TN Charitable Solicitations Registration Yes - Expires Dec 2017
GivingMatters.com Financial Comments
*Agency is part of a national organization. The national organization files a 990 and audit. In 2012 and 2013, the TN office did not have it's own 990 or audit but in an effort to provide TN specific information, the organization provided financial information directly to GivingMatters.com.
 
Financial figures taken from audit.
Audit completed by Rubin Brown, LLP.
Comments provided by Kathryn Bennett 10/3/16.
 
Nonprofit Nurses for Newborns of Tennessee
Address 50 Vantage Way
Suite 101
Nashville, TN 37228 1553
Primary Phone (615) 313-9989
CEO/Executive Director Ms. Amanda Peltz
Board Chair Ms. Mary Scott Throne
Board Chair Company Affiliation Caterpillar Financial
Year of Incorporation 1991
Former Names
Nurses for Newborns Foundation

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