Healing Arts Project, Inc. / HAPI
4641 Chalmers Drive
Nashville TN 37215
HAPI participant John Butts displays his artwork
Mission Statement
The mission of the Healing Arts Project, Inc. (HAPI) is to provide artistic opportunities for persons mental health and addiction recovery to promote healing, community awareness and inclusion.
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director N/A N/A N/A
Board Chair Ms. Lynece Benton-Stewart
Board Chair Company Affiliation Benton Counseling
History & Background
Year of Incorporation 2004
Former Names
Middle Tennessee Mental Health and Substance Abuse Coalition
Organization's type of tax exempt status 501-C3
Financial Summary
Graph: Expense Breakdown Graph - All Years
 
 
Projected Expenses $82,040.00
Projected Annual Revenue $83,930.00 (2018)
Statements
Mission
The mission of the Healing Arts Project, Inc. (HAPI) is to provide artistic opportunities for persons mental health and addiction recovery to promote healing, community awareness and inclusion.
Background

 

A growing number of scientific studies reveal a link between arts participation and increased mental health. Yet many mental illness and substance abuse peer support centers in Middle Tennessee do not have the resources or ability to offer arts participation opportunities to their constituents. So, Healing Arts Project, Inc. (HAPI) decided to meet the need. Originally founded as an awareness and advocacy group, HAPI found that the mental health community it represented desired art classes to aid their recovery. The HAPI concept began in 2004 with art exhibits in conjunction with October Mental Health Awareness Week. In 2005, demand for HAPI art classes and exhibits greatly increased, which led HAPI to provide as many of these opportunities as possible. HAPI’s programs now fall into two categories – programs that directly serve individuals in mental illness and addiction recovery and programs that reduce stigma and promote understanding in our community.
Programs Serving Individuals
Over the past decade, HAPI has grown its impact and reach, currently providing free art classes to over 400 individuals in mental illness and addiction recovery. HAPI encourages and advances HAPI artists by curating, managing, and promoting public exhibits of their work across Middle Tennessee. HAPI also promotes artists by designing, printing, and distributing bookmarks, postcards, and an annual arts and writing booklet – all featuring artwork and writings by HAPI artists.
Programs in the Community
HAPI combats stigma through a variety of educational outreach efforts including activities at community events, art exhibits, and artistic educational publications. HAPI staff and volunteers interact with the general public at art, health, and other community festivals and conferences through one-on-one conversations, educational materials, and arts activities. HAPI raises awareness in the community by curating, managing, and promoting free-to-the-public exhibits featuring artwork by HAPI artists. In 2017, HAPI exhibits were viewed by approximately 28,500 persons across Middle Tennessee. HAPI encourages participation and advocacy by designing, printing, and distributing bookmarks, postcards, and an annual arts and writing booklet ­– all featuring artwork by HAPI artists. These materials describe the mission, goals, and reach of HAPI and encourage empathetic thinking and active advocacy for those in mental health and addiction recovery in the Middle Tennessee community.

Impact

 

HAPI provides an artistic avenue for individuals in mental health and/or addiction recovery by offering free writing and visual arts class opportunities at a variety of peer centers across Middle Tennessee. Through these classes, HAPI enables participants to discover talent within themselves, express their feelings, develop self-respect, create new ways to cope, and build on their artistic knowledge and skill.
In 2017, HAPI produced classes for approximately 400 students in 14 peer centers across Middle Tennessee. After each class series, HAPI teachers ask students to fill out a survey. The feedback demonstrates the impact art creation has on the student. One student stated, “Creating art pulls you out of yourself. It makes you escape from the problems that surround and intrude on your life. Your abilities overcome your disabilities.”
Student survey results of HAPI’s 2017 spring classes reflect what these classes mean to a large majority of the students:
 
· 92 % of students agreed that the art class made a positive impact on their life
· 93% agreed that the class increased their knowledge of art materials and techniques
· 94 % agreed that the class accommodated their individual strengths and needs
· 90 % agreed that they were able to focus on art instead of their illness during class
· 90 % agreed that, at the end of class, they felt more comfortable in social settings
 
HAPI combats stigma, encouraging conversation and acceptance in the Middle Tennessee community through a variety of educational outreach efforts including activities at community events, art exhibits, and artistic educational publications. In 2017, HAPI curated 17 exhibits of artwork created by HAPI artists. These exhibits were on display at multiple locations across Middle Tennessee and viewed by approximately 28,500 persons. HAPI also published "Faith, Hope, and Recovery in Letters" released on line in October 2017, an annual collection of poems and personal essays by persons from across the state in mental health and addiction recovery.
 
Goals during the coming year include the following:
 
1) Establish a stronger financial foundation through increased grants and individual donations.
2) Complete a successful succession transition for the Arts Project Director role.
3) Increase the amount of art exhibitions and hold opening receptions for artists, supporters, and the public.
4) Refine and grow marketing initiatives including website development, creation of an online arts store, etc.

Needs
Healing Arts Project, Inc. needs include:
 
1) A facility to sell art, hold art classes, store artworks and conduct project administration. The goal is to procure the rental of a facility at a discounted rate, making it affordable for HAPI's limited budget.
2) Volunteers who are able and willing to assist with individual fundraising activities.
3) Monetary assistance for artistic operations including art materials and art teacher stipends. Annual expenses in this category are approximately $42,000.
4) Monetary assistance for administrative operations including for website design and management, marketing, public relations, etc. Annual expenses in this category are approximately $32,000.
5) A steady income stream and a paid director of the arts project. This will require at minimum an additional $50,000 of income per year.
Other ways to donate, support, or volunteer
Donations to HAPI can be made by mailing a check to PO Box 23584, Nashville, TN 37202, or by donating art materials, picture frames, yarn, and fabric for creative use by HAPI participants. Volunteers are welcome to help teach art classes in mental health peer centers and assist with art exhibits and the annual fundraiser, Phoenix Art Gala. More information is available on the website www.healingartsprojectinc.org.
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Mental Health & Crisis Intervention / Mental Health Treatment
Secondary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Visual Arts
Areas of Service
Areas Served
TN - Davidson
TN - Montgomery
TN - Bedford
TN - Coffee
TN - Dickson
TN - Maury
TN - Rutherford
HAPI partners with peer support centers across Middle Tennessee to provide art classes for individuals in mental health and addiction recovery. HAPI also presents exhibits at numerous public locations, including public libraries, churches, community organizations, courthouses, etc. These HAPI activities occur in Clarksville, Columbia, Dickson, McMinnville, Murfreesboro, Nashville, Shelbyville, and Tullahoma, Tennessee.
 
HAPI participants live in both urban and rural locations. All have low income and little opportunity to commute for art education and creation on their own. The geography of Middle Tennessee has prompted HAPI’s peer support center partners to provide participants with free transportation to and from art classes.
Board Chair Statement We have found that creating art is a transforming experience for persons in mental health and addiction recovery. Having a chance to focus on a creative project brings joy and peace to individuals and takes their mind off their worries. I include art in my own private practice and my patients look forward to feeling that they can accomplish something special.
CEO Statement
HAPI exists to help people in mental health and addiction recovery and reduce stigma about these disorders in our community. As they’re working toward recovery in peer support centers, individuals with these issues need empowerment. They need to view and show themselves for their abilities rather than their disabilities. They do this very successfully through creative expression and artistic opportunities. Yet, many are low income and can’t afford art classes or materials and their peer support centers often can’t offer consistent arts opportunities.
 
So, HAPI exists to fill that gap in recovery and rehabilitation services. We do this by providing free art classes taught by professional artists, art exhibit and publication opportunities, and outreach events. These opportunities help participants express and externalize their personal struggles. Finding it much easier to express themselves artistically rather than verbally, participants create art to tell their story, promoting healing in themselves and understanding in the community. Much of the art is very high-quality and has the power to change perceptions in the community.
 
HAPI participants deeply value the artistic opportunities we provide. 90% of participants say they feel more self-confident, more comfortable in social situations, abler to cope, and a greater sense of self-worth. Without HAPI, these individuals who have blossomed through art could become suppressed and withdrawn. Individuals in mental health and addiction recovery in Middle Tennessee would not have access to arts opportunities and the public would not learn about the contributions participants make to public values.
 
HAPI offers a new tool in the recovery process through art. We bring art classes and supplies directly to the participants rather than asking them to come to us. We do this through unique, invaluable partnerships with peer support centers across Middle Tennessee and generous funding partners. We charge no fees or dues and tailor class instruction to the individual.
HAPI transforms lives, yet we operate on a bare bones budget. Support from generous funding organizations and individuals ensure the continuation of the unique service we provide to individuals in the recovery process. Donations directly fund HAPI’s mission-based programming, supporting individuals in mental health and addiction recovery and reducing stigma about these disorders. We are very grateful for our supporters and believe that, together, we can make a lasting difference in our community.
Programs
Description

 

HAPI’s mission is to provide artistic opportunities for persons in mental health and addiction recovery, with a vision of increasing arts equity for those with disabilities across Middle Tennessee. We do this by producing arts and writing classes at a variety of peer centers in Davidson county and across Middle Tennessee. HAPI organizes classes, provides art materials, and contracts experienced art teachers. The classes enable participants to discover talent within themselves, express their struggles and happiness, develop self-respect, create ways to cope, and build on their artistic knowledge and skill. A total of 293 art classes were held in 2017 at 14 peer support and community centers.
Classes are planned around mental health principles and visual arts standards and tailored to the individuals. Every artist must develop processes for how they will carry a work through to completion and this ability to direct one’s own process is an elemental step toward recovery. Many participants claim benefits at both the individual and social level, learning to interact with and support their classmates.
HAPI programs are free to participants. Participants are largely under-served, low-income individuals who could not otherwise receive arts training and therapy.
Budget 37000
Category Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Creative Arts Therapy
Population Served Adults, Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers, People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities
Short Term Success

 

In 2017, HAPI produced classes for approximately 400 students at 14 support centers across Middle Tennessee. After each class series, HAPI teachers ask students to fill out a survey. The results of these surveys are compiled and studied for reporting and improvement of HAPI classes. Student survey results of HAPI’s 2017 spring classes reflect what classes mean to a large majority of the students:
o 92 % of students agreed art class made a positive impact on their life
o 93 % agreed art class increased their knowledge of art materials and techniques
o 94 % agreed art class accommodated their individual strengths and needs
o 90% agreed that they were able to focus on art instead of their illness during art class
o 90% agreed they felt more comfortable in social settings as a result of art class
Long term Success
It is our vision that HAPI visual and writing arts classes will help all individuals in mental health and addiction recovery who are involved in Middle Tennessee peer centers achieve recovery (the process in which people are able to live, work, learn, and participate fully in their communities).
Program Success Monitored By
HAPI evaluates the success of art and writing classes both quantitatively and qualitatively. Results are used to assess, report, and improve HAPI programming. HAPI evaluates classes quantitatively by analyzing the number of classes HAPI produces and the number of individuals who participate.
 
Qualitative methods include measuring the impact art classes have on participants and the artistic growth teachers observe in their students. This data is gathered through surveys distributed after each class series (approximately eight classes). Teachers evaluate progress of individual students using surveys that feature a grading scale based on artistic skills in color, design, shape, and perspective. Student surveys include opportunities for student reflection and feedback including: how class changed their self-perception, what class meant to them, suggestions for future classes, and what other art forms interests them.
Examples of Program Success
The essence of success for HAPI’s art and writing classes is the positive impact they have on participants. Do participants find the HAPI’s services helpful? Are their experiences with HAPI a source of strength? Do the skills they learn in class carry over into their day-to-day lives? These are some of the questions we ask when assessing the success of the program. We ask participants to share their thoughts and stories with us. With their permission, we share those stories with the broader community. One such story is that of Barbara Shirley.
 
Barbara’s life has been marked with loss and great challenges, but she considers her story a testament to the fact that anyone can rise above their past. From an early age, she experienced stigma and abuse. The experience instilled in her a desire for independence. Sometimes it was difficult for Barbara to see beauty in life, but several of Barbara’s friends and caregivers encouraged her to let go of the past and move on to celebrate her abilities, particularly her artistry.
 
Through art, Barbara has shed her past and renewed her passion for living in the present. She has achieved independence and finds happiness in herself, taking genuine pleasure in expressing herself through art. “Art is my friend. It’s my release,” Barbara says, “Art is my way of escape into a world of beauty.”
Description

 

HAPI’s mission includes the goal to raise awareness in the community and help combat stigma about mental illness and addiction recovery, thus promoting understanding and acceptance with a vision to increase advocacy for the use of art in the recovery process. By curating, managing, and promoting public exhibits of participants' work across Middle Tennessee, HAPI builds on community partnerships to form a coalition for advocacy and community support. The art exhibits are supported with information about HAPI’s programs, its mission, and the artists whose work is displayed. The exhibits are often in high-volume, public spaces such as the Metro Courthouse in downtown Nashville, Legislative Plaza at the state capitol, the Tennessee Performing Arts Center, and various Nashville Public Library branches.
Exhibitions also encourage and advance HAPI artists. Public display of their work builds artist’s confidence and pride in their own abilities and also brings a new degree of respect and support from their own family, friends, and local community.
Budget 1100
Category Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Creative Arts Therapy
Population Served Adults, Other Health/Disability, General/Unspecified
Short Term Success
The short-term success of HAPI's exhibits is reflected by increased community awareness and support for these exhibits and the artists. This support could manifest itself through increased spaces requesting HAPI exhibits, funding to support HAPI projects and the artists, and art sales from exhibits.

Long term Success
HAPI analyzes the success of exhibits through the amount of people who view them, community feedback and support, and the personal benefits artists share. The goal for these exhibits is that viewers come to better appreciate the role of art in mental health and addiction recovery and see the artists for their abilities rather than their disabilities. For artists, the goal is that these exhibits will build their self-esteem and empower them to pursue their creative endeavors.
 
In 2017, HAPI exhibits reached approximately 28,500 people with a message of hope. Former Chancellor Carol L. McCoy, whose courtroom was adjacent to the gallery in the Metro Courthouse, said, “These works of art offer a reminder that those struggling with personal challenges can find an outlet that enriches not only their lives but the lives of many others.”
Program Success Monitored By
HAPI analyzes the success of exhibits through the amount of people who view them (based upon location reports), community feedback and support (gather in person, in writing, and through press coverage), and the personal benefits artists share (given in person, in writing, or family/friends/counselor reports).
Examples of Program Success
HAPI participants deeply value the experience of having their work recognized in a public HAPI exhibit. One participant, a shy young woman, had kept her head down and rarely spoken in a group. She became active in making art through HAPI and, eventually, one of her pictures was selected for exhibition at the Parthenon Art Museum. When she went to the exhibit and saw her own picture on display, she was changed. She saw herself in a successful light, and began to speak to others in the art class and raise her head to look at other people. This is just one of many stories about the impact HAPI exhibits have on the lives of viewers and artists.
Description

 

HAPI designs, prints, and distributes education publications such as bookmarks, postcards, flyers, notecards, and an annual arts and writing booklet – all featuring artwork and writings by HAPI artists. These publications encourage public participation by stating the mission, goals, and reach of HAPI, encouraging empathetic thinking and active advocacy for the arts and its in the recovery process. Publications, such as postcards and bookmarks, are distributed at various locations across Middle Tennessee, including Nashville Public Library branches. The bookmarks also include the statewide crisis phone number to remind the public that help is available.
These publications encourage and advance HAPI artists, as it enables them to further demonstrate their achievements and inspires community support for their creative endeavors for recovery.
Budget 3700
Category Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Literature
Population Served General/Unspecified, Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers, Other Health/Disability
Short Term Success
Publications inspire involvement and advocacy in the community. Responses from behavioral health clinics where the publications are used in group therapy say that the thoughts and expressions in the poems and essays brought helpful insight and positive change to the individuals.
Long term Success
It is HAPI's hope that our publications will help individuals in mental illness and addiction recovery by showing them examples of like individuals who have overcome challenges and developed new, creative ways to cope. We wish to show these individuals that there are tools at their disposal, such as organizations like HAPI or the crisis line, that can help. We also seek to make a difference in the community by reducing stigma, promoting arts advocacy and understanding, and inspiring community members to become involved in helping individuals in mental illness and addiction recovery through creative outlets.
Program Success Monitored By
HAPI assesses the success of its publications through the number of publications distributed, requests for more publications in certain locations, community feedback (spoken or written), and the number of people becoming involved in HAPI (volunteering, donating, purchasing artist's work) as a result of publications.
Examples of Program Success
HAPI's publications share a message of empathy and hope and are especially beneficial to other individuals in mental health and addiction recovery. One example of this is when a psychiatrist in a hospital behavioral health clinic requested copies of HAPI's annual booklet, she said she wanted it for use in patient therapy. She reported that the expressions of hope and resiliency reflected by the writers inspired the patients to believe they could also find a way to cope with their problems.
Description

The goal of HAPI's outreach programming is to increase equity and understanding, reduce stigma, and build advocacy for the arts and its benefits in the recovery process. HAPI staff and volunteers interact with the general public at art, health, and other community festivals and conferences through one-on-one conversations, printed materials, and arts activities. Additionally, HAPI produces an annual Service of Hope, an Ecumenical service sharing stories of hope for recovery. The service features original poetry, original art, special music, and personal statements from those in recovery and their families. At the service, those in recovery, their families, and the general public come to stand in solidarity together and reflect on the challenges and triumphs we experience together and the creative ways we use to express them.

Budget 1200
Category Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Creative Arts Therapy
Population Served Adults, Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers, Other Health/Disability
Short Term Success
HAPI's outreach programs raise awareness and support for the use of art in mental health and addiction recovery. This becomes apparent when casual visitors to our booths and programs ask to learn more and express the desire to give to HAPI or volunteer their time to help with our cause.
 
Gaining attendance at these outreach events is another measure of short-term success, as more people tell others in the community about HAPI and invite them to become involved.
Long term Success

HAPI's vision of outreach efforts success is that the Middle Tennessee community come to support those in mental illness and addiction recovery with resources, understanding, acceptance, and arts advocacy.

Program Success Monitored By HAPI monitors success of outreach activities by recording the number of outreach events we attend, the number of people in attendance at our events, the public's involvement in our outreach activities, community connections built, and communication with individual community members.
Examples of Program Success
At HAPI's annual Service of Hope, individuals in mental health or addiction recovery get up and share their stories with attendees. One year, a young woman who had a history of addiction along with bipolar disorder shared her story of recovery and success. It was an uplifting and powerful message and gave the listeners the motivation to make changes in their own life related to addiction.
CEO Comments
HAPI will be undertaking activities for advancing HAPI's place in the broader arts community to enlarge the public knowledge of the project and promote the artists. HAPI has the assistance of people who want to give back to their community and assist in completing the work involved.
Board Chair
Board Chair Ms. Lynece Benton-Stewart
Company Affiliation Benton Counseling
Term Jan 2016 to Dec 2018
Email bentoncounseling@comcast.net
Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Ms. Lynn Lasley Bartrum The EstuaryVoting
Ms. Jane Baxter NAMI TennesseeExofficio
Ms. Lynece Benton-Stewart Benton Counseling and Consulting ServiceVoting
Judge Melissa Blackburn Mental Health and Veterans CourtVoting
Ms. Molly Bombardi-Mount Centerstone Research instituteVoting
Ms. Kelly Dorsey-Steele BlueCare TennesseeVoting
Mr. Jeff Fladen NAMI TennesseeVoting
Mr. Joshuah Gregory Dept. Finance and Administration; Dept. of Safety and Homeland Security Law, Safety and Correction DomainVoting
Ms Emma Johnson Park CenterVoting
Ms. Ann Krafft community volunteerVoting
Ms. Mary Linden Salter TAADASVoting
Ms Kubra Snow United HealthcareVoting
Ms. Evelyn Yeargin Mental Health CooperativeVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 6
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 1
Female 10
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 3
Board Term Limits 3
Board Meeting Attendance % 70%
Does the organization have written Board Selection Criteria? Under Development
Does the organization have a written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage of Board Members making Monetary Contributions 60%
Percentage of Board Members making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Does the Board include Client Representation? Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 12
Board CoChair
Board CoChair Kubra Snow
Company Affiliation UnitedHealthcare Community Plan
Term Jan 2016 to Dec 2018
Email kubra_e_snow@uhc.com
Standing Committees
Executive
Finance
Community Outreach / Community Relations
Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)
CEO Comments
Healing Arts Project, Inc. (HAPI) provides artistic opportunities for persons in mental health and addiction recovery to promote healing, and community awareness and inclusion.  The opportunity to express their creativity through the arts and to show their artwork in public increases self-esteem and self-confidence of the artists.  They are seen as persons with abilities and talent.
 
Healing Arts Project, Inc. (HAPI) collaborates with a number of partner organizations to provide artistic experiences that promote and encourage mental health and addiction recovery.  HAPI is unique in providing these opportunities to persons who have low income and few opportunities for creative expression and public recognition.  Reducing stigma in the public is a slow process, but the positive effect of seeing the meaningful artwork created by persons in recovery demonstrates that individuals who live with mental illness and/or addiction are included as important people with value in the community.
Executive Director/CEO
Executive Director N/A N/A N/A
Email N/A
Staff
Full Time Staff 0
Part Time Staff 2
Volunteers 30
Contractors 12
Retention Rate 0%
Plans & Policies
Does the organization have a documented Fundraising Plan? Yes
Does the organization have an approved Strategic Plan? Yes
Number of years Strategic Plan Considers 4
When was Strategic Plan adopted? Jan 2018
In case of a change in leadership, is a Management Succession plan in place? Under Development
Does the organization have a Policies and Procedures Plan? Under Development
Does the organization have a Nondiscrimination Policy? Yes
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Nashville Arts Coalition2012
Tennesseans for the Arts2018
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Agency Award for meeting the needs of persons with disabilities in the community, advocating, and networking with other agencies/organizationsMetro Nashville Mayor's Advisory Committee for People with Disabilities2010
Model ProjectNAMI Tennessee2012
Emma25 Lifetime ServiceEmma2014
Senior Staff
Title Arts Project Director
Experience/Biography
Ann Krafft is succeeding Jane Baxter in leadership of Healing Arts Project. Ann has been an active community volunteer for several years. She has been a weekly volunteer with Healing Arts Project, Inc. weekly art class at Park Çenter South. She has passion to be involved with persons in mental health and addiction recovery and brings a caring concern to the project. Many persons with mental illness do not have the opportunities for success that are found in Healing Arts Project, Inc. Since 2004, the project has gained strength in helping the artists find personal success and self-respect that has contributed greatly to their recovery.
CEO Comments
Due to budget limitations, Healing Arts Project, Inc. operates with a minimum of management personnel. The current Arts Project Director has a wide range of responsibilities for accountability of grants and assuring that all aspects of the project are operating as they should be. HAPI is challenged to find new resources to support more paid staff who can undertake program management and accountability. The 400 artists who participate have received tremendous benefits in personal growth and wellness through the program. Moving ahead, HAPI is focusing on fundraising success to provide a steady stream of income, expand paid staff, and also spread the administrative work load. More recognition of HAPI in the broader arts community is a goal so we can attract a wide number of supporters who will buy art, donate time and funds, promote the artists, and take on volunteer responsibilities.
 
 
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2018
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2018
Projected Revenue $83,930.00
Projected Expenses $82,040.00
Endowment Spending Policy N/A
Detailed Financials
Revenue SourcesHelpThe financial analysis involves a comparison of the IRS Form 990 and the audit report (when available) and revenue sources may not sum to total based on reconciliation differences. Revenue from foundations and corporations may include individual contributions when not itemized separately.
Fiscal Year201720162015
Foundation and
Corporation Contributions
$23,165$0$0
Government Contributions$23,993$0$0
Federal$0$0$0
State$9,850$0$0
Local$14,143$0$0
Unspecified$0$0$0
Individual Contributions$9,715$28,025$42,538
$0$0$0
$16,197$22,835$21,075
Investment Income, Net of Losses$4,089$3,055$4,697
Membership Dues$0$0$0
Special Events$3,597$7,483$5,456
Revenue In-Kind$0$0$0
Other$0$0$173
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201720162015
Program Expense$45,782$63,955$63,932
Administration Expense$17,035$0$0
Fundraising Expense$0$0$0
Payments to Affiliates--$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses1.290.961.16
Program Expense/Total Expenses73%100%100%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201720162015
Total Assets$45,583$27,645$30,202
Current Assets$44,347$27,645$30,202
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$0$0$0
Total Net Assets$45,583$27,645$30,202
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201720162015
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201720162015
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201720162015
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions, Gifts, and Grants $23,165Contributions, Gifts and Grants $28,025Contributions, Gifts and Grants $42,538
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountProgram Revenue $16,197Program Revenue $22,835Program Revenue $21,075
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountLocal Government Grants $14,143Fundraising Events $7,483Fundraising Events $5,456
Capital Campaign
Is the organization currently conducting a Capital Campaign for an endowment or the purchase of a major asset? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit
TN Charitable Solicitations Registration Yes - Expires June 2018
Organization Comments
Our project stretches the dollars received as far as possible through considerable volunteer effort. Healing Arts Project, Inc. has made a significant difference in the lives of persons in mental health and addiction recovery. Donations of any amount go directly to serve the consumer participants. Grants are spent according to the budget submitted with the application. The grants that require filing of expense statements and invoices before payment cause spending to appear greater than revenue. The fourth quarter revenue on a grant may not be received until well into the first quarter of the next year. This presents a picture of deficit spending when actually it is reflective of slow reimbursement by grant agencies.
GivingMatters.com Financial Comments
This organization changed its name to Healing Arts Project in 2012, as confirmed in the IRS Letter of Determination.
 
Financial figures are taken from the 990EZ.
990 was prepared internally by the nonprofit.
Compilation completed by Carson & McKinney, CPAs, PLLC.
Comments provided by Nicole Rose 03/19/2018.
Nonprofit Healing Arts Project, Inc. / HAPI
Address 4641 Chalmers Drive
Nashville, TN 37215
Primary Phone (615) 665-2914
CEO/Executive Director N/A N/A N/A
Board Chair Ms. Lynece Benton-Stewart
Board Chair Company Affiliation Benton Counseling
Year of Incorporation 2004
Former Names
Middle Tennessee Mental Health and Substance Abuse Coalition

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