Healing Arts Project, Inc. / HAPI
4641 Chalmers Drive
Nashville TN 37215
John Butts displays his artwork
Mission Statement
The mission of the Healing Arts Project, Inc. (HAPI) is to provide an avenue for persons in mental health and addiction recovery to express their creativity through a wide range of artistic endeavors.  In this way we raise awareness in the community and help combat stigma about these disorders, thus promoting understanding, acceptance, and success. 
Leadership
CEO/Executive Director
Board Chair Ms. Lynece Benton-Stewart
Board Chair Company Affiliation Benton Counseling
History & Background
Year of Incorporation 2004
Former Names
Middle Tennessee Mental Health and Substance Abuse Coalition
Organization's type of tax exempt status 501-C3
Financial Summary
Graph: Expense Breakdown Graph - All Years
 
 
Projected Expenses $66,590.00
Projected Annual Revenue $67,850.00 (2017)
Statements
Mission The mission of the Healing Arts Project, Inc. (HAPI) is to provide an avenue for persons in mental health and addiction recovery to express their creativity through a wide range of artistic endeavors.  In this way we raise awareness in the community and help combat stigma about these disorders, thus promoting understanding, acceptance, and success. 
Background

A growing number of scientific studies reveal a causal link between arts participation and increased mental health. Yet many mental illness and substance abuse peer support centers in Middle Tennessee do not have the resources or ability to offer arts participation opportunities to their constituents. So, Healing Arts Project, Inc. (HAPI) decided to meet the need. Originally founded as an awareness and advocacy group, HAPI found that the mental health community it represented desired art classes to aid in their treatment. The HAPI concept began in 2004 with art exhibits in conjunction with October Mental Health Awareness Week. In 2005, demand for HAPI art classes and exhibits greatly increased, which led HAPI to provide as many of these opportunities as possible. HAPI’s programs now fall into two categories – programs that directly serve individuals in mental illness and addiction recovery and programs that reduce stigma and promote understanding in our community.

Programs Serving Individuals

Over the past decade, HAPI has grown its impact and reach, currently providing free art classes to over 500 individuals in mental illness and addiction recovery. HAPI encourages and advances HAPI artists by curating, managing, and promoting public exhibits of their work across Middle Tennessee. HAPI also promotes artists by designing, printing, and distributing bookmarks, postcards, and an annual arts and writing booklet – all featuring artwork and writings by HAPI artists.

Programs in the Community

HAPI combats stigma through a variety of educational outreach efforts including activities at community events, art exhibits, and artistic educational publications. HAPI staff and volunteers interact with the general public at art, health, and other community festivals and conferences through one-on-one conversations, printed materials, and arts activities. HAPI raises awareness in the community by curating, managing, and promoting free-to-the-public exhibits featuring artwork by HAPI artists. In 2016, HAPI exhibits were viewed by approximately 30,000 persons across Middle Tennessee. HAPI encourages participation and advocacy by designing, printing, and distributing bookmarks, postcards, and an annual arts and writing booklet ­– all featuring artwork by HAPI artists. These materials describe the mission, goals, and reach of HAPI and encourage empathetic thinking and active advocacy for those in mental health and addiction recovery in the Middle Tennessee community.

Impact

HAPI provides an artistic avenue for those in mental health and substance abuse recovery by offering free writing and visual arts class opportunities at a variety of peer centers across Middle Tennessee. Through these classes, HAPI enables participants to discover talent within themselves, express their struggles and their happiness, develop self-respect and new ways to cope, and build on their artistic knowledge and skill.

In 2016, HAPI produced classes for approximately 500 students in 14 peer centers across Middle Tennessee. After each class series, HAPI teachers ask students to fill out a survey. The feedback demonstrates the impact art creation has on the student. One student stated, “Creating art pulls you out of yourself. It makes you escape from the problems that surround and intrude on your life. Your abilities overcome your disabilities.” Student survey results of HAPI’s 2016 spring classes reflect what these classes mean to a large majority of the students:

· 95.5% of students agreed that the art class made a positive impact on their life

· 97% agreed that the class increased their knowledge of art materials and techniques

· 92.5% agreed that the class accommodated their individual strengths and needs

· 94% agreed that they were able to focus on art instead of their illness during class

· 95.4% agreed that, at the end of class, they felt more comfortable in social settings

HAPI combats stigma, encouraging conversation and acceptance in the Middle Tennessee community through a variety of educational outreach efforts including activities at community events, art exhibits, and artistic educational publications. In 2016, HAPI curated 30 exhibits of artwork created by HAPI artists. These exhibits were on display at multiple locations across Middle Tennessee and viewed by approximately 30,000 persons. HAPI also published "Faith, Hope, and Recovery in Letters 2016" released in October 2016, an annual collection of poems and personal essays by persons from across the state in mental health and addiction recovery.

Goals during the coming year include expanding more opportunities for volunteers to be involved, developing succession planning for Arts Project Director transition, creating a marketing plan, developing more opportunities for HAPI artwork sales, bringing HAPI message to more community events, and producing more exhibits.

Needs Persons in our community need education to better understand, respect and accept persons in mental health and addiction recovery and to overcome stigma that prevents individuals from seeking help. People who receive mental health services need opportunities to be recognized for their strengths and talents, and to have positive ways to spend their time. The Healing Arts Project, Inc. needs a place to sell art, hold art classes, store artworks and conduct project administration. The Healing Arts Project, Inc. has set a goal that by 2017 there will be a steady income stream and a paid director of the arts project.  This will require at minimum an additional $50,000 income per year.
Other ways to donate, support, or volunteer
Donations to HAPI can be made by mailing a check to PO Box 23584, Nashville, TN  37202, or by donating art materials, picture frames, yarn, and fabric for creative use by HAPI participants.  Volunteers are welcome to help teach art classes in mental health peer centers and assist with art exhibits and the annual fundraiser, Phoenix Art Gala.  More information is available on the website www.healingartsprojectinc.org.
 
Service Categories
Primary Organization Category Mental Health & Crisis Intervention / Mental Health Treatment
Secondary Organization Category Arts,Culture & Humanities / Visual Arts
Areas of Service
Areas Served
TN - Davidson
TN - Montgomery
TN - Bedford
TN - Coffee
TN - Dickson
TN - Maury
TN - Rutherford
Middle Tennessee counties served by the Healing Arts Project are highly rural in nature, except for the metropolitan areas of Davidson County and Rutherford County.  The people who participate in the Healing Arts Project, Inc. live in both urban and rural locations.  All have low income and little opportunity to travel to participate in art education and art making on their own.  They are also limited in funds to buy art materials.  The geography of Middle Tennessee has prompted the peer support centers where the Healing Arts Project, Inc. delivers services to provide transportation to the centers for participants. HAPI contracts with qualified professional art instructors to hold art classes at the peer support centers and provides art materials to students in the art classes. 
Board Chair Statement Statistics show that one in five adults and children experience a mental disorder in their lifetime, suicide is the third leading cause of death for persons ages 15 to 24, 8.2% of persons age 12 and older abuse drugs, and 1 in 13 adults abuse alcohol. The Healing Arts Project, Inc. focuses on overcoming stigma through education that persons with mental illness and substance abuse disorders can recover and contribute to the community. When HAPI started the arts project, we thought that persons who took part in the classes would put a high value on improving  their artistic ability.  Over time, what we have actually seen is that growth in personal self-respect and self-confidence is the most beneficial outcome of HAPI.  These inner feelings of worth bring hope to the artists and  hope keeps them well, out of the hospital, and contributing to their group.  Stigma in the community against people who have mental illnesses and addictions is still a reality.  Placing art exhibits in public places and reading the artists' statements about the role of art in their lives connects the viewers with the artists and increases understanding
CEO Statement We have found that creating art is a transforming experience for persons in mental health and addiction recovery.  Having a chance to focus on a creative project brings joy and peace to individuals and takes their mind off their worries.  I include art in my own private practice and my patients look forward to feeling that they can accomplish something special. 
Programs
Description

HAPI’s mission is to provide artistic opportunities for persons in mental health and addiction recovery, with a vision of increasing arts equity for those with disabilities across Middle Tennessee. We do this by producing arts and writing classes at a variety of peer centers in Davidson county and across Middle Tennessee. HAPI organizes classes, provides art materials, and contracts experienced art teachers. The classes enable participants to discover talent within themselves, express their struggles and happiness, develop self-respect and ways to cope, and build on their artistic knowledge and skill.  A total of 306 art classes were held in 2016 at 14 peer support and community centers.

Classes are planned around mental health principles and visual arts standards and tailored to the individuals. Every artist must develop processes for how they will carry a work through to completion and this ability to direct one’s own process is an elemental step toward recovery. Many participants claim benefits at both the individual and social level, learning to interact with and support their classmates.

HAPI programs are free to participants. Participants are largely under-served, low-income individuals who could not otherwise receive arts training and therapy.
Budget 37000
Category Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Creative Arts Therapy
Population Served Adults, Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers, People/Families with of People with Psychological Disabilities
Short Term Success

In 2016, HAPI produced classes for approximately 500 students at 14 support centers across Middle Tennessee. On average, 94% of the students who enroll attend classes. After each class series, HAPI teachers ask students to fill out a survey. The results of these surveys are compiled and studied for reporting and improvement of HAPI classes. Student survey results of HAPI’s 2016 spring classes reflect what classes mean to a large majority of the students:

o 95.5% of students agreed art class made a positive impact on their life

o 97% agreed art class increased their knowledge of art materials and techniques

o 92.5% agreed art class accommodated their individual strengths and needs

o 94% agreed that they were able to focus on art instead of their illness during art class

o 95.4% agreed they felt more comfortable in social settings as a result of art class

 
Long term Success
It is our vision that HAPI visual and writing arts classes will help all individuals in mental health and addiction recovery who are involved in Middle Tennessee peer centers achieve recovery (the process in which people are able to live, work, learn, and participate fully in their communities).
Program Success Monitored By
Attendance records kept for each class. 
Summary records maintained.
Student and instructor surveys conducted at end of sessions. 
Skills report completed by instructors at end of sessions. 
Artist statements completed with art submitted for exhibit.
Goal Attainment Survey used for Artist Master Class. 
Writers complete Writers Workshop and score their achievement of goals. 
 
Examples of Program Success
One of the artists was particularly shy and withdrawn when HAPI started art classes and art exhibits.  She had been through a troubled emotional journey in her life and suffered from a brain disorder that affected her ability to organize her thoughts.  She has a natural artistic talent and started attending classes.  Her case manager has been very supportive and arranges transportation for her.  One of her pictures was selected for exhibit at The Parthenon in 2007 when the project exhibited "A Road to Mental Wellness."  Seeing her artwork on public display in this public setting changed her outlook.  She started carrying her personal portfolio of artwork and sharing it with interested persons.  She attends art classes whenever they are scheduled.  In 2013 she was awarded the Healing Arts Project, Inc. Spirit of Artists Award to recognize an individual whose expressive art is part of their recovery and who shares their creativity in HAPI activities and events. 
Description

HAPI’s mission includes the goal to raise awareness in the community and help combat stigma about mental illness and addiction recovery, thus promoting understanding and acceptance with a vision to increase advocacy for the use of art in the recovery process. By curating, managing, and promoting 24 public exhibits of participants' work seen by about 30,000 persons across Middle Tennessee, HAPI builds on community partnerships to form a coalition for advocacy and community support. The art exhibits are supported with information about HAPI’s programs, its mission, and the artists whose work is displayed. The exhibits are often in high-volume, public spaces such as the Metro Courthouse in downtown Nashville, Legislative Plaza at the state capitol, the Tennessee Performing Arts Center, and various Nashville Public Library branches.

Exhibitions also encourage and advance HAPI artists. Public display of their work builds artist’s confidence and pride in their own abilities and also brings a new degree of respect and support from their own family, friends, and local community.
Budget 1100
Category Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Creative Arts Therapy
Population Served Adults, Other Health/Disability, General/Unspecified
Short Term Success

HAPI analyzes the success of exhibits through the amount of people who view them, community feedback and support, and the personal benefits artists share. In 2016, HAPI exhibits reached approximately 30,000 people with a message of hope. Former Chancellor Carol L. McCoy, whose courtroom was adjacent to the gallery in the Metro Courthouse, said, “These works of art offer a reminder that those struggling with personal challenges can find an outlet that enriches not only their lives but the lives of many others.” Artists who see their work exhibited report greater self-esteem, pride in their artistic accomplishments, and empowerment to control their future.

Long term Success
The long term success of having artwork shown in public is that all the artists gain self-confidence and self-respect and are able to contribute to their community.  They have confidence in their artistic means of coping with the problems in their life. Additionally, stigma about mental illness addiction disorders in the community is reduced and there is more understanding and support for these individuals as they work toward recovery using creative outlets. By using exhibitions to educate the community about art in recovery, HAPI encourages more community members to advocate for the arts and its benefits in the recovery process.
Program Success Monitored By
HAPI analyzes the success of exhibits through the amount of people who view them (based upon location reports), community feedback and support (gather in person, in writing, or through press), and the personal benefits artists share (given in person, in writing, or family/friends/counselor reports).
Examples of Program Success
One very shy young woman had kept her head down and never spoken in a group.  She became active in making art and one of her pictures was selected for exhibition at the Parthenon Art Museum.  When she went to the exhibit and saw her own picture on display, she was changed.  She saw herself in a successful light, and began to speak to others in the art class and raise her head to look at other people.
Description

HAPI designs, prints, and distributes education publications such as bookmarks, postcards, flyers, notecards, and an annual arts and writing booklet – all featuring artwork and writings by HAPI artists. These publications encourage public participation by stating the mission, goals, and reach of HAPI, encouraging empathetic thinking and active advocacy for the arts and its in the recovery process. Publications, such as postcards and bookmarks, are distributed at various locations across Middle Tennessee, including Nashville Public Library branches. The bookmarks also include the statewide crisis phone number to remind the public that help is available.

These publications encourage and advance HAPI artists, as it enables them to further demonstrate their achievements and inspires community support for their creative endeavors for recovery.  
Budget 3700
Category Arts, Culture & Humanities, General/Other Literature
Population Served General/Unspecified, Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers, Other Health/Disability
Short Term Success
Publications inspire involvement and advocacy in the community. Responses from behavioral health clinics where the publications are used in group therapy say that the thoughts and expressions in the poems and essays brought helpful insight and positive change to the individuals. 
Long term Success
It is HAPI's hope that our publications will help individuals in mental illness and addiction recovery by showing them examples of like individuals who have overcome challenges and developed new, creative ways to cope. We wish to show these individuals that there are tools at their disposal, such as organizations like HAPI or the crisis line, that can help. We also seek to make a difference in the community by reducing stigma, promoting arts advocacy and understanding, and inspiring community members to become involved in helping individuals in mental illness and addiction recovery through creative outlets.
Program Success Monitored By
Records of number of publications distributed.
Requests for more publications in certain locations.
People becoming involved in HAPI (volunteering, donating, purchasing artist's work) as a result of publications. 
Examples of Program Success
A psychiatrist in a hospital behavioral health clinic requested copies of HAPI's annual booklet for use in patient therapy. She reported that the expressions of hope and resiliency reflected by the writers inspired the patients to believe they could also find a way to cope with their problems. 
Description

The goal of HAPI's outreach programming is to increase equity and understanding, reduce stigma, and build advocacy for the arts and its benefits in the recovery process. HAPI staff and volunteers interact with the general public at art, health, and other community festivals and conferences through one-on-one conversations, printed materials, and arts activities. Additionally, HAPI produces an annual Service of Hope, an Ecumenical service sharing stories of hope for recovery. The service features original poetry, original art, special music, and personal statements from those in recovery and their families. At the service, those in recovery, their families, and the general public come to stand in solidarity together and reflect on the challenges and triumphs we experience together and the creative ways we use to express them. 

Budget 1200
Category Mental Health, Substance Abuse Programs, General/other Creative Arts Therapy
Population Served Adults, Alcohol, Drug, Substance Abusers, Other Health/Disability
Short Term Success
Gaining attendance at our outreach events is a measure of short-term success, as more people tell others in the community about HAPI and invite them to become involved.
Long term Success

HAPI vision of outreach efforts success is the creation of a community that supports those in mental illness and addiction recovery with resources, understanding, acceptance, and arts advocacy.

Program Success Monitored By HAPI monitors success of outreach activities by recording the number of outreach events we attend, the number of people in attendance at our events, the public's involvement in our outreach activities, community connections built, and communication with individual community members.
Examples of Program Success
A young woman who had a history of addiction along with bipolar disorder shared her story of recovery and success at the Service of Hope.  This gave the listeners the motivation to make changes in their own life related to addiction.
CEO Comments
Most of the work to provide the opportunity for creative expression to persons in mental health and addiction recovery is done by volunteers.  Devoting the time to coordinate the community activities, prepare grant requests for funding, prepare art for exhibit, install exhibits, keep records, coordinate with art teachers, and gather art materials is challenging. HAPI will be undertaking activities for advancing HAPI's place in the broader arts community to enlarge the public knowledge of the project and promote the artists.  HAPI has the assistance of people who want to give back to their community and assist in completing the work involved.  HAPI will develop and implement a volunteer program in the coming year through developing job descriptions and linking with college internship and volunteer programs as well as listings with Hands On Nashville.  HAPI will also strengthen partnerships with hospitals and service agencies.
Board Chair
Board Chair Ms. Lynece Benton-Stewart
Company Affiliation Benton Counseling
Term Jan 2017 to Dec 2017
Email bentoncounseling@comcast.net
Board Members
NameAffiliationStatus
Ms. Jane Baxter NAMI TennesseeVoting
Ms. Lynece Benton-Stewart Benton Counseling and Consulting ServiceVoting
Ms. Molly Bombardi-Mount Centerstone Research instituteVoting
Ms. Elizabeth Byler AmerigroupVoting
Ms. Kelly Dorsey-Steele BlueCare TennesseeVoting
Ms Emma Johnson Park CenterVoting
Ms. Jennifer Jones TN Mental Health Consumers AssociationVoting
Ms. Mary Linden Salter TAADAS
Ms Kubra Snow United HealthcareVoting
Ms. Evelyn Yeargin Mental Health CooperativeVoting
Board Demographics - Ethnicity
African American/Black 4
Asian American/Pacific Islander 0
Caucasian 6
Hispanic/Latino 0
Native American/American Indian 0
Other 0 0
Board Demographics - Gender
Male 0
Female 10
Unspecified 0
Governance
Board Term Lengths 1
Board Term Limits 10
Board Meeting Attendance % 70%
Does the organization have written Board Selection Criteria? Under Development
Does the organization have a written Conflict of Interest Policy? Yes
Percentage of Board Members making Monetary Contributions 60%
Percentage of Board Members making In-Kind Contributions 100%
Does the Board include Client Representation? Yes
Number of Full Board Meetings Annually 12
Board CoChair
Board CoChair Kubra Snow
Company Affiliation UnitedHealthcare Community Plan
Term Jan 2017 to Dec 2017
Email kubra_e_snow@uhc.com
Standing Committees
Executive
Finance
Community Outreach / Community Relations
Special Events (Golf Tournament, Walk / Run, Silent Auction, Dinner / Gala)
CEO Comments
The Healing Arts Project, Inc. (HAPI) provides artistic opportunities for persons in mental health and addiction recovery to promote healing, and community awareness and inclusion.  The opportunity to express their creativity through the arts and to show their artwork in public increases self-esteem and self-confidence of the artists.  They are seen as persons with abilities and talent, not with disabilities.
The Healing Arts Project, Inc. (HAPI) collaborates with a number of partner organizations to provide artistic experiences that promote and encourage mental health and addiction recovery.  HAPI is unique in providing these opportunities to persons who have low income and few opportunities for creative expression and public recognition.  Reducing stigma in the public is a slow process, but the positive effect of seeing the meaningful artwork created by persons in recovery demonstrates that persons who live with mental illness and addictions are included as important people with value in the community.
Staff
Full Time Staff 0
Part Time Staff 16
Volunteers 30
Contractors 15
Retention Rate 0%
Plans & Policies
Does the organization have a documented Fundraising Plan? Yes
Does the organization have an approved Strategic Plan? Yes
Number of years Strategic Plan Considers 4
When was Strategic Plan adopted? June 2014
In case of a change in leadership, is a Management Succession plan in place? Under Development
Does the organization have a Policies and Procedures Plan? Under Development
Does the organization have a Nondiscrimination Policy? Yes
Affiliations
AffiliationYear
Nashville Arts Coalition2012
Tennesseans for the Arts2008
Awards
Award/RecognitionOrganizationYear
Agency Award for meeting the needs of persons with disabilities in the community, advocating, and networking with other agencies/organizationsMetro Nashville Mayor's Advisory Committee for People with Disabilities2010
Model ProjectNAMI Tennessee2012
Emma25 Lifetime ServiceEmma2014
Senior Staff
Title Art Project Director
Experience/Biography
Jane Baxter has led the Healing Arts Project since it began in 2004.  She has a Master's Degree in Public Health Nutrition and had 25 years' experience working for state public health departments.  The opportunity to become involved in the recovery of persons in mental health and addiction disorders was prompted by the recovery of one of her own family's daughters who has a mental illness.  Many persons with mental illness do not have the opportunities for success that are found in the Healing Arts Project, Inc. Over the years since 2004 the project has gained strength in helping the artists find personal success and self-respect that has contributed greatly to their recovery.
CEO Comments
The Healing Arts Project, Inc. operates with a minimum of management personnel.  The project has little funding for administrative staff. The current Arts Project Director has a wide range of responsibilities for accountability of grants and  assuring that all aspects of the project are operating as they should be. HAPI is challenged to find new resources to support more paid staff who can undertake program management and accountability. The 500 artists who receive services have received tremendous benefits in personal growth and wellness through having the program available to them. Moving ahead, we need HAPI fundraising success to provide a steady stream of income to expand paid staff and also spread the administrative work load. More recognition of HAPI in the broader arts community is a goal so that we can attract a wide number of supporters who will buy art, donate time and cash, promote the artists, and take on volunteer responsibilities.
 
 
Fiscal Year
Fiscal Year Start Jan 01 2017
Fiscal Year End Dec 31 2017
Projected Revenue $67,850.00
Projected Expenses $66,590.00
Endowment Spending Policy N/A
Detailed Financials
Expense Allocation
Fiscal Year201620152014
Program Expense$63,955$63,932$65,636
Administration Expense$0$0$0
Fundraising Expense$0$0$0
Payments to Affiliates$0$0$0
Total Revenue/Total Expenses0.961.161.09
Program Expense/Total Expenses100%100%100%
Fundraising Expense/Contributed Revenue0%0%0%
Assets and Liabilities
Fiscal Year201620152014
Total Assets$27,645$30,202$20,194
Current Assets$27,645$30,202$20,194
Long-Term Liabilities$0$0$0
Current Liabilities$0$0$0
Total Net Assets$27,645$30,202$20,194
Short Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Current Ratio: Current Assets/Current Liabilities------
Long Term Solvency
Fiscal Year201620152014
Long-Term Liabilities/Total Assets0%0%0%
Top Funding Sources
Fiscal Year201620152014
Top Funding Source & Dollar AmountContributions, Gifts and Grants $28,025Contributions, Gifts and Grants $42,538Contributions, Gifts and Grants $40,575
Second Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountProgram Revenue $22,835Program Revenue $21,075Program Service Revenue $26,534
Third Highest Funding Source & Dollar AmountFundraising Events $7,483Fundraising Events $5,456Fundraising Events $4,722
Capital Campaign
Is the organization currently conducting a Capital Campaign for an endowment or the purchase of a major asset? No
Capital Campaign Anticipated in Next 5 Years? No
State Charitable Solicitations Permit
TN Charitable Solicitations Registration Yes - Expires June 2017
Organization Comments
Our project stretches the dollars received as far as possible through considerable volunteer effort. The Healing Arts Project, Inc. has made a significant difference in the lives of persons in mental health and addiction recovery. Donations of any amount go directly to serve the consumer participants in the project. Grants are spent according to the budget submitted with the application. The grants that require filing of expense statements and invoices before payment cause spending to appear greater than revenue. The fourth quarter revenue on a grant may not be received until well into the first quarter of the next year. This presents a picture of deficit spending when actually it is reflective of slow reimbursement by grant agencies.
GivingMatters.com Financial Comments
This organization changed its name to Healing Arts Project in 2012, as confirmed in the IRS Letter of Determination.
 
Financial figures are taken from the 990.
990 was prepared internally by the nonprofit.
Foundations & Corporations are included with Individual Contributions.
Compilation completed by Peacock Financial, Inc.
Comments provided by Kathryn Bennett 5/22/17.
Nonprofit Healing Arts Project, Inc. / HAPI
Address 4641 Chalmers Drive
Nashville, TN 37215
Primary Phone (615) 665-2914
Board Chair Ms. Lynece Benton-Stewart
Board Chair Company Affiliation Benton Counseling
Year of Incorporation 2004
Former Names
Middle Tennessee Mental Health and Substance Abuse Coalition

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