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Jackson Area Council on Alcoholism & Drug Dependency (JACOA)

Last Updated: 5/23/2013 12:27:23 PM

Nonprofit

Jackson Area Council on Alcoholism & Drug Dependency (JACOA)

Address

900 East Chester Street


Jackson, TN 38301-
Madison

Primary Phone

(731) 423-3653

Primary Fax

(731) 422-2820

Contact Email

info@jacoa.org

Facebook

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CEO/Executive Director

Mr. Barry F Cooper, M.S.

Board Chair

Dr. Janet Furness

Board Chair Company Affiliation

Union University

Board Members

View

Year of Incorporation

1965

Former Names


Overview

The mission of JACOA treatment programs is to provide outcome effective services to reclaim the potential of persons who have become addicts (dependent upon) alcohol and other mind altering substances. 

More Background

Programs

JACOA Treatment and Recovery Program

Tennessee Teen Institute

View Program Details

Financials

For more details regarding the organization's financial information, select the financial tab and review available comments.

Projected Revenue

$2,036,000

Projected Expenses

$2,000,000

View Financial Details


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